Iguanodon

(redirected from Iguanadon)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Iguanodon

(ĭgwăn`ədŏn) [Gr., = iguana tooth], herbivorous ornithiscian dinosaurdinosaur
[Gr., = terrible lizard], extinct land reptile of the Mesozoic era. The dinosaurs, which were egg-laying animals, ranged in length from 2 1-2 ft (91 cm) to about 127 ft (39 m).
..... Click the link for more information.
, characterized by teeth similar to those of the iguanaiguana
, name for several large lizards of the family Iguanidae, found in tropical America and the Galapagos. The common iguana (Iguana iguana) is a tree-living, strictly vegetarian species found along streams from Mexico to N South America.
..... Click the link for more information.
, a horny beak, spikelike thumbs, and a powerful tail. It may have been capable of walking on either two or four feet. Fossils remains of the 30-ft-long (9-m) reptile have been found in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the W United States in strata of the early Cretaceous period, approximately 135–110 million years ago. It possessed characteristic spikelike thumbs. Iguanodon, the second dinosaur to be formally named, was first described by Gideon Mantell, an English physician and geologist. He credited his wife, Mary Ann Woodhouse Mantell, with the discovery. An impressive find by miners in a Belgian coal mine in 1878 turned up more than 20 nearly complete fossil skeletons.

Iguanodon

[i′gwän·ə‚dän]
(paleontology)
A herbivorous ornithopod dinosaur, 30 feet (9 meters) long and weighing 5 tons, that appeared during the Early Cretaceous Period.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pecyn Bwyd y Deinosor tells the story of Alys, who has to put up with a school trip to a museum without her packed lunch until a friendly iguanadon comes to her aid.
Only Disney could make a scaly iguanadon seem cute and turn a lumbering brachiosaur into an eccentric elderly lady (voiced by Joan Plowright).
When a giant comet collides with the Earth, a young iguanadon named Aladar and the lemurs he calls family are thrown into a world of danger and adventure.
Now, 25 more slabs bearing the footprints of extinct giants like the Iguanadon have been moved to safety from Coombe-field Quarry in Portland.