Bullying

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Bullying

Chowne, Parson Stoyle
terrorizes parish; kidnaps children. [Br. Lit.: The Maid of Sker, Walsh Modern, 94–95]
Claypole, Noah
bully; becomes thief in Fagin’s gang. [Br. Lit.: Oliver Twist]
Curley
he picks on feeble-minded Lennie. [Am. Lit.: Of Mice and Men]
Flashman, Harry
unconscionably impudent and overbearing coward. [Br. Lit.: Flashman; Tom Brown’s Schooldays]
hector
street gang member (early 1600s). [Br. Hist.: Espy, 40]
Kowalski, Stanley
crude humor, animal maleness. [Am. Lit.: A Streetcar Named Desire]
McTeague
forbidden to practice dentistry, he becomes mean and surly. [Am. Lit.: McTeague]
References in periodicals archive ?
Le systeme d'education est aussi remis en question et les problemes de l'intimidation a l'ecole (ijime) et de reclusion chez soi (hikikomori)--qui est considere comme une extension du probleme du refus d'aller a l'ecole (futoko) (Ide 2007)--ne sont que quelques exemples parmi d'autres de ces changements sociaux.
This ijime continues until the victim shows no spontaneity or initiative and becomes completely homogeneous.
Thus translations vary between countries including 'mobbning' in Swedish (Olweus, 1999), 'Ijime' in Japanese (Morita et al., 1999) or 'Schikanieren' in German (Losel & Bliesener, 1999).
The language teacher and Pamela created a lesson in which the students created netsuke an ijime, ceremonial ornaments for male and female kimono.
Japanese-style classrooms are also plagued by corporal punishment (taibatsu), bullying (ijime), and teenage suicide, the predictable response, says Reid, to a high-pressure environment where outsiders can easily disturb the Japanese wa, or group harmony.
Even more recently, the problem of supervisors and coworkers bullying their subordinates and peers in the workplace, known as ijime, has become a major social issue.
According to Der Spiegel, German educators have repeatedly characterized Japanese schools as suffering from gakkyu hokain (collapsing discipline), ijime (bullying), and juken jigoku (exam hell).
Tout d'abord sont apparus dans le milieu scolaire une serie de problemes qualifies de pathologiques, comme la violence a l'ecole (konai boryoku), la persecution de certains eleves par leurs camarades de classe (ijime) et le fameux syndrome du refus de l'ecole (futoko ou toko kyohi; voir a ce sujet Lock 1990).
The currently well-publicized incidence of ijime or bullying (chiefly in middle schools) is said to be the product of high pressure and conformity in schools.
Elbert also confirms the comments of earlier authors that ijime - bullying - occurs when the object of the bullying is perceived as somehow "different." Elbert rejects the word ijime, though, saying that kurushime - torturing - is more accurate.
During the year since the Second Bracey Report, other descriptions of Japanese schools emerged, portraying at least the secondary system as something less than a pleasant place.(*) The New York Times featured an article on ijime, the bullying that takes place in Japanese schools.[33] According to this article, which begins with the bullying death of a middle school student, those most vulnerable are students who are wealthier and brighter, yet fail "to be part of the group in a society that demands conformity."