Ijo

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Ijo

 

(also Ijaw; self-designation, Ije), a people living in southern Nigeria in the delta of the Niger River. Population, approximately 800,000 (1967 estimate). The Ijo’s language is conventionally attributed to the Guinean group of languages. The majority of the Ijo are Christians, but some retain the local traditional beliefs. At the beginning of the 15th century, the Ijo founded the city of Bonny, which was one of the centers of the slave trade in West Africa. The principal occupations are tropical agriculture (yams, manioc, and sweet potato), gathering the fruit of the oil palm, and fishing.

References in periodicals archive ?
She is an Ijo but her family is from across the river.
Using an interdisciplinary approach, we propose to investigate the local meanings of infertility as they are shaped by the larger social and cultural context; the impact of the prevalence of infertility on these meanings; and how the above influence community responses, life-experiences and infertility treatment-seeking behaviors of the Ijo and the Yakurr people.
The two communities, Patani, the Ijo community in the Niger Delta and Ugep in Cross River State, are primarily rural and are located in southern Nigeria.
He has collected and translated the Ozidi Saga, one of the most popular folk epics from the Ijos of the Niger Delta.
Soyinka is a Yoruba, whereas Clark-Bekederemo is an Ijo from Kiagbodo which is described by Nduka Nwosu as follows: Tucked away from the seat of power somewhere in the northern belt of the Burutu Local Government headquarters, bordered by the creeks of Bomadi river and a long stretch of land east of Ughelli in Delta State, is the ancient city of Kiagbodo whose sons and daughters gathered recently to enact for posterity's sake, a befitting status for a great man of history, the legendary Ambakederemo Ogein, ninth generation descendant of Ngbile, the founder of Kiagbodo kingdom.
(1987), le neerlandais de Berbice se serait forme de la rencontre des Hollandais et des Ijos. L'on suppose generalement que les pidgins et creoles resolvent le problemes de communication parmi les membres du groupe substratique.
Par exemple, le neerlandais de Berbice a (comme l'ijo) des postpositions que le modele universaliste bickertonien ne permet meme pas; d'autant plus que Bickerton (1981, 1984) pretend que les prepositions n'existent pas dans la grammaire du bioprogramme.
Notons, par exemple, l'ordre des constituants de la phrase dans le neerlandais de Berbice, ou il est SVO alors que dans le neerlandais (de Hollande) et l'ijo (parle au Nigeria), il est mixte: SOV dans certains types de constructions et SVO dans d'autres.