Illimani


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Illimani

(ēyēmä`nē), mountain, 21,184 ft (6,457 m) high, E Bolivia. One of the highest peaks of the Cordillera Real of the Bolivian Andes, it is permanently snowcapped. Illimani was first climbed by Baron Conway of Allington in 1898.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Illimani

 

a mountain massif in the Cordillera Real (central Andes) in western Bolivia. Elevations range to 6,462 m. The Illimani is composed of granites. The northeast slopes have permanent snow cover and glaciers.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Illimani

a mountain in W Bolivia, in the Andes near La Paz. Height: 6882 m (22 580 ft.)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Muchas veces eso desmoraliza y no se le valora porque en la sociedad esto no se aprecia (Illimani, hospital).
Last month, the Parque Zonal Illimani football pitch was awarded FIFA Quality Certification by the international football governing body.
''It's awesome: the quiet, the view, the Illimani. It's perfect,'' the 25-year-old bank employee told AFP.
They are also carrying out a study of a wetland near the Illimani glacier, a national symbol that is gradually receding.
He was part of a group of 19 climbers from the UK and Netherlands who arrived in Mendoza, Argentina in early January to prepare for their assault on Aconcagua, which is 500 metres higher than his previous highest climb, Mount Illimani in Bolivia.
In 1997, Aguas del Illimani, led by Paris-based Suez, the world's second largest water and wastewater corporation, obtained a 30-year contract to operate the cities' water and sewer systems, but by 2005 long-festering anger over massive rate hikes and poor service contributed to public protests, a general strike, and social unrest.
On July 24, 1997, about three weeks after the first Superintendent was appointed, a 30-year concession for the municipal water utility that served the neighbouring cities of La Paz and El Alto was granted to Aguas del Illimani, a consortium controlled by the French multinational Suez (Superintendencia de Aguas, 1997).