Illyricum


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Illyricum

a Roman province founded after 168 bc, based on the coastal area of Illyria

Illyricum

 

(1) The territory (Illyricum regnum) inhabited by an Illyrian tribe, the Ardaei, which was conquered by the Romans in 167 B.C. In 148 B.C. it became part of the Roman province of Macedonia.

(2) A Roman province probably formed in the second century B.C. (at the very latest, under Caesar in the mid-first century B.C.). It was on the territory of the remaining Illyrian tribes, which were conquered by the Romans at the end of the first century B.C. In A.D. 8, the extremely large province was divided into two parts: Upper Illyricum, or Dalmatia, and Lower Illyricum, or Pannonia.

(3) During the Roman Empire, the name given to a customs district that included the Danubian provinces of Rhaetia, Nori-cum, Pannonia, Dacia, Dalmatia, and Moesia. Under the emperor Diocletian (at the end of the third century), the district was divided into a western section (Illyricum occidentale) and an eastern section (Illyricum orientale). The district had great economic and strategic military significance for the Roman empire.

References in periodicals archive ?
La acestea, s-a adaugat dorinta unor episcopi ai Romei de a se amesteca, necanonic, in treburile bisericilor din Illyricum. Din aceasta perioada, incep sa apara anumite deosebiri intre cele doua mari biserici, dispute hristologice sau eclesiale, care vor duce la marea schisma din 16 iulie 1054.
(29) Syria, Mesopotamia, and Illyricum (if not precisely Dalmatia) are known to have been military theaters during his reign, while his family's ties to Apamea justify references to Syria and Laodicea and his personal curiosity about Judaism could have prompted the inclusion of Judea.
(13.) Meslin suggests that Germinius changed his allegiance from Nice 360 to the Dated Creed through the influence of the Homoiousians, perhaps even Basil himself, who was exiled to Illyricum in 360: see Michel Meslin, Les Ariens d'Occident, 335-430 (Paris: Editions de Seuil, 1967), 290.
(2003) Roman mining in Illyricum: historical aspects.
As Romans states, Paul is convinced that he has completed his work in the east (Asia and the Aegean basin), having proclaimed the gospel as far as Illyricum (present-day Serbia and Croatia).
It is difficult to determine Isidore's source for this observation, but his association of the Slavic occupation of Greece with the loss of Syria and Egypt to the Persians indicates his attention to the entire Mediterranean basin, (58) Peter Charanis has insisted that Isidore's notion of Graecia was vague and that he might have been referring to what had formerly been known as Illyricum, rather than to Greece proper.
Rome's leader at Cannae, Lucius Aemilius Paulus, had earned distinction in successful campaigns in Illyricum (in the approximate area of modern Albania).
State Department functionaries studying trays of smoked salmon spoke of sending the 82nd Airborne Division to punish insolent barbarians not only in the deserts of Mesopotamia but also in the forests of Illyricum and the mountains of Cyrene; patrician lawyers gazing from high windows into the darkness of Central Park mentioned the imminent passage of new federal regulations (apropos the penal system and the tax code) intended to impose on America's plebeian rabble a long-overdue regime change equivalent to the military occupation of Iraq; trend-setting publishers in Greenwich Village, alert to a revived interest in the Emperor Caesar Augustus, commissioned new biographies amplifying Edward Gibbon's compliment to "the sublime perfections of an Eternal Parent and an Omnipotent Monarch."
They named the province Illyricum. The place, and the name, lasted until the sixth or seventh centuries A.D.