Ilokano


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Ilokano

 

(also Iloki), a people living primarily on the western coast of the island of Luzon in the Philippines, as well as in the valley of the Cagayan River and the coastal regions of the island of Mindanao. Some Ilokano live outside the Philippines—in the Hawaiian Islands, on the island of Guam, and in California. The Ilokano number about 4.5 million (1970, estimate). Their language belongs to the Indonesian language group. They profess Christianity (Catholicism and Aglipayanism, a local Protestant doctrine), but vestiges of their pre-Christian beliefs remain. The principal occupation is agriculture aided by irrigation (rice, corn, yams, sugarcane, tobacco, cotton, and other crops); the Ilokano also raise buffalo, swine, and chickens. Handicrafts developed by the Ilokano include cotton quilting and making articles from gold, shell, and ebony.

REFERENCE

Narody Iugo-Vostochnoi Azii. Moscow, 1966.
References in periodicals archive ?
I think there was a special bond between the two because they were both Ilokanos.
It strains credulity to assume that Ilokanos developed a deep-seated pasyon idiom in this interval and that that idiom enabled them to conceive of a pattern to universal history and of their role in it.
Organisations elected for 2012-2013 are Alpha Phi Omega UAE Alumni Association, CIASI 61892 International Inc (Samahang Ilokano), Filipino DanceSport and Social Club, Filipino Dubai Teachers Association, Mindanao State University Alumni Association -- UAE and Fil HR.
That familiar Ilokano toscani, her cheeks sucking air,
In Ilokano, for example, the intensifying adjectival prefix naka- selects for a reduplicated base whose first member is truncated to a maximal syllable, or perhaps minimal foot (CVC):
The questionnaire was written both in English and in the vernacular language, Ilokano, to ensure comprehension of the questions and items asked.
The new database catalogs and provides links to print materials written in the following languages: Khmer, Chamorro, Chinese, Hawaiian, Hmong, Ilokano, Korean, Samoan, Tagalog, Tongan, and Vietnamese, as well as English-language materials culturally tailored for Native Hawaiian populations.
This Ilokano phrase refers to a woman who is separated from her husband.
KOLONIA Federated States of Micronesia ILOKANO (Web2), OOLIKAN (OED oolakan 1953q)
While she conveys well the fragmented sense of self resulting from insertion into alienating and racist labour regimes, her argument is overly predicated on a romanticised version of Ilokano masculinity as a 'seamless whole' valorising 'intimacy' and 'trust' which is then shattered by the disjunctures of late-stage industrial capital.
59-81; Raul Pertierra, "Community and Power in an Ilokano Municipality", in From Marcos to Aquino, pp.
As they are, a lot of the Ilokano folk songs I learned in my youth are memorable, and our kundiman, such as the classicBayan Koare world class.