Imamate


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Imamate

 

(1) One of the forms of Muslim theocracy.

(2) In the history of the peoples of the USSR, a Murid state in Dagestan and Chechia; it arose in the late 1820’s during the struggle of the peoples of the Caucasus against the colonialist policy of tsarism. It was at its height during the years of the rule of Shamil (1824—59), when it concealed its purely secular goals under the religious screen of Muridism. Its goal was to strengthen the class domination of the Dagestan and Chechen feudal lords, who led the struggle against the tsarist forces. The imamate was supported by the militarized Murids, the closest associates of the imam and the machinery of his authority in the outlying districts. By the early 1850’s, the internal crisis of the imamate deepened, and the contradictions sharpened between the naibs (the imam’s deputies) and the peasants, who were beginning to leave Shamil’s movement.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Saleh government accused Abdul-Malek's Ansarullah of trying to revive the imamate and re-establish a Zaidi theocracy similar to Iran's in north-western Yemen.
The Imamate and various approaches to it remain the center of the Shi'a doctrine (one of usul ad-din) which affects all other basic doctrinal questions of this Islamic sect, and the conflict over the nature and scope of the Imam's authority has been the reason for divisions within Shi'ism itself.
It was only in 1962 that the country's republican revolution put a sudden end to Yemen's Hashemite Imamate.
To him Iran is an "Imamate" not a republic, a system invented by Western "Infidels" in the 18th century.
It was led by Hussein Badr ud-Din al-Houthi, a fire-brand anti-US theologian who declared an end to the Yemeni republic and proclaimed a Zaidi Imamate in its place and made himself its head, with the title of Amir al-Mu'mineen (prince of the faithful).
Valeri is highly critical of the imamate as the embodiment of "traditional democracy" (pp.
The government says the rebels want to revive the imamate rule in Yemen, and accuse Iranian sides of financing Yemeni rebel operations--a claim both the Houthis and Tehran deny.
The Yemeni government accuses the Houthis of seeking to restore an imamate overthrown in a 1962 coup that sparked eight years of civil war.
An offshoot of Shiite Islam, the Zaidis are a minority in mainly Sunni Yemen but form the majority community in the north and want to re-establish the imamate overthrown in a 1962 coup.
Tuesday's sentencing comes amid continue clashes between government troops and Shi'ite Zaidi rebels who reject the legitimacy of the ruling government and demand the restoration of the Zaidi imamate overthrown in a 1962 coup.
To justify the war, they imposed on the Houthi movement a confessional characteristic, accusing the Houthis of seeking to revive the Zaydi imamate and thus undermine the republic," he wrote in AN NAHAR.
The government has accused the Houthis of trying to restore the traditional Zaidi-led imamate that largely ruled Yemen until 1962.