Imbrication


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imbrication

[‚im·brə′kā·shən]
(geology)
Formation of an imbricate structure. Also known as shingling.

Imbrication

Overlapping rows of shaped tiles or shingles that resemble overlapping fish scales; it is also called fish-scale pattern.

imbrication

imbrication
Overlapping rows of shaped tiles or shingles that resemble overlapping fish scales; also see contre-imbrication.
References in periodicals archive ?
It will be of great interest to historians and literary scholars alike in its attention to the mutual imbrication of historical event and personal narrative; since it explores in fascinating ways the intersection of self, narrative, and experience it also contributes to philosophically oriented inquiries about the nature of experience.
Even as they are routinely encountered and addressed through national rubrics--indeed, even as the racial has shaped the contours of the national--the freighted transnational legacies and wrenching spatial transformations of slavery, conquest, and colonialism reveal the porosity, the deep imbrication and coconstruction, of the foreign and the domestic, the inside and the outside.
attitudes toward the imbrication of race, sex, and political radicalism.
Coverage includes beach chair and lateral decubitis positioning, shoulder portals, diagnostic arthroscopy of the shoulder, subacromial decompression, distal clavicle excision, bridging suture techniques for rotator cuff repair, subscapularis repair, repair of massive rotator cuff tears, superior labral repair, anterior labral repair, capsular imbrication (plication), arthroscopic capsular release, coracoplasty, and anthroscopic biceps tenodesis.
For one thing, it tends to be much too fond of locutions such as "alterity," and "imbrication," those contemporary instances of academic-speak that camouflage rather than clarify.
The result is that Heine, no matter how perspicacious he was in recognizing the imbrication of creative writing and the marketplace, seeks recourse to a rationality that 'delivers poetry entirely into the power of the market process' (p.
For those who are familiar with Harvey's large opus of work, the book does not cover too much new ground, though it does serve as a good and highly readable overview of theorizing the imbrication of space and society, even if it tends to focus upon capital's role in shaping economic landscapes to the exclusion of how workers do so (a tendency critiqued by labour geographers in the past decade or so).
Similarly, the emergence of liberal capitalism, a process understood as underwritten by both a well-defined middle-class identity and by Protestant evangelicalism, seems far less certain in the case of the Colby family, whose imbrication in commercial and industrial transformation of the Eastern Townships sat uneasily with the persistence of gentry values and with their commitment to Methodism.
Cohen underscores the imbrication of filth's history with that of human civilization itself, claiming that filth "is an enduring--perhaps foundational--feature of human existence" (viii).
Although Fowkes Tobin aims to revise a postcolonial criticism that "has focused on colonial and postcolonial subjectivity, [while] little attention has been paid to the representation of nature" (10), the insight regarding Hodges's landscapes and melancholia, of course, reveals the deep imbrication of the two.