Imbrium Basin

Imbrium Basin

(im -bree-ŭm) The second youngest lunar basin, of which much of the second and third rings survive as mountain arcs (see table at mountains, lunar). The ejecta blanket of the basin covers much of the nearside and provides the major reference horizon for lunar stratigraphy. The basin was formed 3850 million years ago and was flooded with basalt lavas during at least the following 600 million years. This produced Mare Imbrium (Sea of Rains), which was visited by Lunokhod 1, and also Palus Putredinis, which was sampled by Apollo 15. See also Fra Mauro formation; Imbrian System.
References in periodicals archive ?
Researchers have long puzzled over the grooves surrounding the crater known as the Imbrium basin.
But the Imbrium basin, where Chang'e-3 landed, contains some of the younger flows -- 3 billion years old or slightly less.
Chang'e-3, an unmanned lunar mission, that touched down on the northern part of the Imbrium basin on Moon - one of the most prominent of the lava-filled impact basins visible from Earth - has spotted volcanic rocks unlike those returned by Apollo and Luna missions, Daily Mail reported.
The Imbrium basin, for example, spans roughly 930 kilometers (580 miles), while that of Mare Crisium (Sea of Crises) near the Moon's eastern limb (edge) is 740 km wide.
Apollo 14 landed in the Fra Mauro highlands, touching down on material ejected billions of years ago from the great Imbrium basin, 400 miles north.
According to the researchers, the 1,160-kilometer-wide Imbrium basin, along with the main rock in the meteorite, formed when an asteroid struck the moon 3.
This is a small-scale version of the low spots of Sinus Aestuum, Mare Vaporum, and Mare Frigoris that occur beyond the Apennine rim of the Imbrium basin.
The astronauts collected their samples near the moon's huge Imbrium basin, and the researchers suggest the cordierite bit was "excavated" by the same impact that formed Imbrium.
Shoemaker first applied this stratigraphic interpretation to the southeast corner of the Imbrium basin, stretching from Copernicus to Archimedes.
There is still some uncertainty as to where the Descartes breccia came from, but many scientists believe the source was either the Nectaris impact basin or the much more distant Imbrium basin.
This inner face, called the Apennine Front, is the top of a deep fault formed when the floor of the original Imbrium basin subsided.
For example, the main rim of the relatively young Imbrium basin (which contains Mare Imbrium) is Montes Apenninus, which curves around just V4 of the basin's circumference, and appears to have formed that way.