Imerina

Imerina

 

a state in Madagascar from the 14th to the early 19th century.

Imerina arose on the central plateau, the most economically developed region of the island. Ethnically, the population was made up of the Merina, one of the groups of the Malagasy. In the late 16th century, during the reign of King Ralambo (c. 1575–1610), the state unified the entire central plateau. Under his son Andrianjaka (ruled approximately 1610–30), the capital of Imerina, Analamanga (“blue woods”), was founded; soon after, it was named Antananarivo. Feudal relations had formed i n Imerina by the 17th century. Terraced irrigated farming (rice was the main crop), handicrafts, and trade attained a high level of development. Under King Andriamasinavaluna (c. 1667–87), Imerina was a centralized feudal state. After his death, a period of discord and civil wars began, and the state disintegrated into independent principalities. Its reunification occurred as a result of persistent wars, which began the unification of all the lands of the island under King Andrianampoinimerina (1787–1810). Under Radama I (ruled 1810–28), the state received the name of the Malagasy Kingdom or the Kingdom of Madagascar.

References in periodicals archive ?
Sont mis en relief les fonctionnements macro que peuvent indexer les kabary et kisarisary, micropratiques rythmant le quotidien Imerina (1).
It traces the Imerina, forest depletion (1790-1861), science illustration and the normalizing of fauna in nineteenth-century Madagascar, merging customary law and national land legislation, land rights and alien plants in dryland Madagascar, parenting through boom and bust in northern Malagasy mining towns, nature/culture dualism of mining engagements, land acquisition Madagascar, and political crisis.
His book provoked considerable public controversy in Imerina, and received negative reviews from intellectuals such as Louis Michel [4] and Maurice Bloch, [5] who followed earlier authors, including Alfred and Guillaume Grandidier [6] and Raymond Decary, [2] who alluded to, but summarily rejected, the alleged tradition of funereal cannibalism among the Merina.
14] It was also noted in Madagascar during the imperial campaigns of Ranavalona I of Imerina in the period 1829-1853, both among the Taisaka on the southeast littoral of the island, and the Ikongo of the southeast plateau who ate Merina captives during a prolonged siege of their hilltop fortress.
Yet other authors saw in the bright colours evidence of the influence of British artisans who worked in Imerina from 1820.
This situation led to the emergence of two main areas for the concentration of settlement, around Nosy-Be and around Tambohorano, between the Sakalavas, and in more isolated settlements in Imerina.
While official Vezo discourse constructs jaoloka as "lazy," a good many were migrants to the area who couldn't rely on the labor of kin to help them build houses; and in central Imerina men followed their spouses when the women had access to more land.
See for example Rita Astuti, People of the Sea: Identity and Descent Among the Vezo of Madagascar (Cambridge, UK, 1995); Sophie Blanchy, "Femmes et Residence Familiale: Quelques notes sur les regles, les faits contemporains et l'ideologie en Imerina," in Sarah Fee, ed.
Rabearivelo, a largely self-educated man who earned his living as a proofreader for the Imerina Printing Press, wrote seven volumes of poetry before committing suicide in 1937.
Je m'interesserai plus particulierement a la situation en Imerina, dans les Hautes Terres centrales de Madagascar, region majoritairement peuplee de Merina.
Rahajesy presentent le rapport rituel aux ancetres renouvele en Imerina, a Madagascar.
A Imerina, comme dans l'est et le nord de Madagascar, on utilise des fosses communes, mais les pratiques qui se rattachent aux ceremonies funeraires sont variees.