imine

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Related to Imines: Schiff base, Nitriles

imine

[′i‚mēn]
(organic chemistry)
A class of compounds that are the product of condensation reactions of aldehydes or ketones with ammonia or amines; they have the NH radical attached to the carbon with the double bond, as R‒HC=NH; an example is benzaldimine.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bajaj, Asymmetric Allylation of Sulfonyl Imines Catalyzed by in Situ Generated Cu (II) Complexes of Chiral Amino Alcohol Based Schiff Bases, Rsc Adv., 4, 56424 (2014).
In IR spectra of corresponding product display the absence of characteristic absorption band near 1580-1590 [cm.sup.-1] due to C=N stretching of imines and appearances of 1670 [cm.sup.-1] of C=O stretch indicate the formation of four membered [beta]-lactum ring.
Herein, with the aim of obtaining multifunctional photoand ionochromic and fluorescent compounds, we report the synthesis of novel 5-phenylpyrazolidin-3-one-based azomethine imines containing 2-((1H-imidazol-2-yl)methylene) 1, 2-(pyridin-2-ylmethylene) 2, 2-(quinolin-2-ylmethylene) 3, and2-((8-hydroxyquinolin-2-yl)methylene) 4 substituents and the investigation of their photochromic, fluorescent, and chemosensor properties.
Aziridine 2-methyl- is an imine which is widely spread in ten sampling stations out of thirteen (Table 7).
Peaks observed in the regions 159.27-159.29 and 160.48-162.49 ppm are due to imines and urethane carbonyl carbons, respectively (30).
Goodman, "Mechanism of BINOL-phosphoric acid-catalyzed strecker reaction of benzyl imines," Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol.
In the presence of tin(II) chloride, bromonitromethane reacts with imines derived from aromatic aldehydes and ammonia to yield 2-amino-2-aromatic substituted nitroethane derivatives via an addition reaction in good yields [2].
It has been reported elsewhere that primary amines produce imines on reaction with aldehydes and ketones, although ketones react more slowly than aldehydes, sometimes requiring higher temperatures and longer reaction times.
Furthermore, for reduction, gold can hydrogenate alkenes, alkynes, imines and carbonyls in the presence of H2.
Alkylation of ketones and imines, asymmetric allylic alkylation, phase-transfer catalysis, radical reactions and enzymatic methods.
Today, there are a variety of LMW and HCD coagulants on the market, from polyamides and polyamines, to polyethylene imines, alum, ferric chloride and so on.