constant

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constant

1. a specific quantity that is always invariable
2. 
a. Maths a symbol representing an unspecified number that remains invariable throughout a particular series of operations
b. Physics a theoretical or experimental quantity or property that is considered invariable throughout a particular series of calculations or experiments
3. See logical constant
http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Constants/index.html
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Constant

 

in prosody, a constant element in the rhythmic organization of verse; mainly, a constant stress on a certain syllable. Thus, in the verse of M. Iu. Lermontov’s narrative poem Mtsyri, the constant is the constant word boundary after each eighth syllable (boundary of the verse) and the constant stress on the last, eighth syllable of each segment.

Vse luchshe pered kem-nibúd’
Slovami oblegchit’ mne grúd;
No liudiam ia ne delal zlá,
I potomu moi delá
Ne mnogo pol’zy vain uznát’;
A dushu mozhno l’ rasskazát’? … 

Constant

 

a quality that has the same value throughout a given discussion. The constancy of the quality x can be expressed symbolically as x = const. Constants are often represented by the letters C and K.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

constant

[′kän·stənt]
(science and technology)
A value that does not change during a particular process.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

constant

In programming, a fixed value in a program. Minimum and maximum amounts, dates, prices, headlines and error messages are examples.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in classic literature ?
We know some things about the future, for example what eclipses there will be; but this knowledge is a matter of elaborate calculation and inference, whereas some of our knowledge of the past comes to us without effort, in the same sort of immediate way in which we acquire knowledge of occurrences in our present environment.
She knew not the exact degree of his affection for his aunt, or his dependence on her judgment, but it was natural to suppose that he thought much higher of her ladyship than she could do; and it was certain that, in enumerating the miseries of a marriage with one whose immediate connections were so unequal to his own, his aunt would address him on his weakest side.
Had Napoleon not ridden out on the evening of the twenty-fourth to the Kolocha, and had he not then ordered an immediate attack on the redoubt but had begun the attack next morning, no one would have doubted that the Shevardino Redoubt was the left flank of our and the battle would have taken place where we expected it.
"I rather think you are mistaken, for when I was talking to her yesterday of getting a new grate for the spare bedchamber, she observed that there was no immediate hurry for it, as it was not likely that the room would be wanted for some time."
I wrote back, warmly acknowledging my obligations to his kindness, and apologising for not expressing my thanks personally, in consequence of my immediate recall on pressing business to town.
The idea of the story had suggested itself to him, we are told, before he had finished its immediate forerunner, "The Last of the Mohicans." He chose entirely new scenes for it, "resolved to cross the Mississippi and wander over the desolate wastes of the remote Western prairies." He had been taking every chance that came of making a personal acquaintance with the Indian chiefs of the western tribes who were to be encountered about this period on their way in the frequent Indian embassies to Washington.
What you mean is that people accept an immediate pain rather than an immediate pleasure.
Then there were the calls of hunger; and Silas, in his solitude, had to provide his own breakfast, dinner, and supper, to fetch his own water from the well, and put his own kettle on the fire; and all these immediate promptings helped, along with the weaving, to reduce his life to the unquestioning activity of a spinning insect.