immune response

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immune response

[i′myün ri‚späns]
(immunology)
The physiological responses stemming from activation of the immune system by antigens, consisting of a primary response in which the antigen is recognized as foreign and eliminated, and a secondary response to subsequent contact with the same antigen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Utilizing the NIAID Category B protozoa to better understand the innate immune response to eukatyotic pathogens may lead to new broad spectrum immunotherapeutics and adjuvants for protozoan vaccines.
The Immune Response Corporation is a biopharmaceutical company dedicated to treating and preventing HIV and AIDS through the development of immune- based therapeutic vaccines such as Remune, its lead product candidate.
In all, these data suggest that the direct consequences of high level virus replication alone cannot account for the progressive CD4+ T cell depletion leading to AIDS, and that active antiviral cellular immune responses may not always be beneficial.
With a better understanding of the immune response, these intriguing results might offer new directions for therapy and vaccines.
All four produced a strong immune response to the cancer-associated protein, though the response waned with time.
That matrix supports an outer shell, which holds the proteins that trip an immune response.
Intranasal immunization of HA-containing SHIV VLPs elicits augmented humoral and cellular immune responses in both systemic and mucosal compartments;
The technology - which is based upon the combination of an adjuvant with virosomes - achieves a significantly enhanced immune response to an antigen challenge.
To test how well their model reflects real molecular evolution, the researchers looked to the maturation of the immune response.
This trial is being conducted in order to evaluate the potential impact of a higher dose of tgAAC09 and boost vaccination on the strength and duration of immune responses.
Antigen: a substance (usually a protein or carbohydrate, such as from an invading bacterium or virus) that stimulates an immune response.
Men who could stop the shocks and tones may have been in a state of alertness that promoted lower immune responses, Weisse notes, although their immune measures remained in the normal range.