immune response

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immune response

[i′myün ri‚späns]
(immunology)
The physiological responses stemming from activation of the immune system by antigens, consisting of a primary response in which the antigen is recognized as foreign and eliminated, and a secondary response to subsequent contact with the same antigen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Denise Faustman, director of immunobiology at Boston's Massachusetts General Hospital, presented a modified paradigm that suggests that environmental factors could be responsible for modifying the normal immune response mainly at the level of protein expression--that is, downstream of the genes themselves.
A genetic factor that enables the T-cells to initiate an inappropriate immune response. Each of these elements is likely a necessary part of the MS disease process, but none of them alone may be sufficient to cause MS.
The researchers then searched for links between the immune response as measured by Hepatitis B antibodies, hormone levels and attractiveness.
This microbe acts as a trigger for the subsequent immune response. Using toll-like receptors (TLR) and other receptors, pDCs may pick up these antigens through pattern recognition.
It is not uncommon for immune responses to dietary proteins to be viewed as having two possible outcomes: priming for allergic sensitization, or the development of tolerance resulting in immunologic unresponsiveness.
Surprisingly we have found that SIV-infected sooty mangabey monkeys do not develop AIDS despite high level virus replication, short longevity of infected cells and limited anti-SIV specific cellular immune responses....
This finding suggests that a viremic phase may precede symptoms and that the onset of symptoms in the prodromal stage may be associated with humoral and cellular immune responses rather than viremia.
Immune responses against hemagglutinin are known to be associated with protection against influenza infection and include the hemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies found in the bloodstream after immunization with the nasal flu vaccine.
"In our study, we were interested in investigating whether the ability of the immune system to detect a pathogen is under circadian control and whether there are timing-associated consequences for the subsequent immune response."
Therefore these genes represent major targets of T cell immune responses in HIV-infected humans.
And although it is clearly a setback for vaccine development, we are not too worried by the news that a person's immune response to HIV infection may not protect against another HIV infection.
It is also clear that feed restriction alters innate and specific immune function; however, its effects on allergic immune responses and resultant inflammation are not known.