imperative programming

(redirected from Imperative languages)

imperative programming

References in periodicals archive ?
In Section 2, we present declarative agent-oriented languages, while Section 3 covers the imperative languages and Section 4 some hybrid languages.
non-agent oriented, imperative languages for developing multi-agent systems; as a result, in practice agent notions are often implemented in an ad-hoc manner.
Purely imperative languages are unusual in the Agents literature, as in essence they are inappropriate for expressing the high-level abstractions associated with agent systems design.
This is reminiscent of state transformations in imperative languages, where execution of an assignment statement alters the contents of the store.
Traditional denotational semantics models imperative languages using state-to-state functions [Scott and Strachey 1971; Tennent 1991].
The intervening years, however, have seen the development of a relational semantics of polymorphism [Reynolds 1983]; possible world semantics of imperative languages [Reynolds 1981b; Oles 1982]; a connection between polymorphism and local state [O'Hearn and Tennent 1995]; and linear logic [Girard 1987].
On the other hand, implementation in traditional imperative languages is pretty cumbersome due to lack of facilities that support backtracking.
The AAA combines the features of the abstract machines for imperative languages and for logic programming languages.
Imperative languages are so widely used (and for so long), they have become "natural" to most programmers.
An individual method is programmed in an imperative language and performs a single, cohesive function.
We believe, as did McGraw in 1984, that increased productivity, generality, utility, protability, and performance are only possible if programmers avoid the constraints of imperative languages and adopt a higher level of abstraction.
Regarding the first two items, however, imperative languages fail to meet the requirements.