Impervious surfaces

Impervious surfaces

Constructed surfaces that are impenetrable by water. Impervious surfaces can lead to excessive stormwater runoff and limit the amount of stormwater that remains onsite or recharges local aquifers. Pervious or porous surfaces allow some water infiltration, thereby reducing runoff.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because impervious surfaces typically absorb more solar radiation than natural ones do, the water entering streams in urbanized areas can be as much as 6[degrees]C warmer than it would be if the area were undeveloped.
Australia's sensitive and rare endemic water bugs are in decline around our urban fringes because streams and waterways are receiving unnatural runoff from the impervious surfaces laid in developed areas.
impervious surfaces in a watershed," says DigitalGlobe's Chuck Herring.
Development replaces soil and vegetation that once soaked up rainwater and snowmelt with the impervious surfaces of roofs and roads.
The USGBC offers credit points for exterior landscapes with a minimum of 30 percent of non-roof impervious surfaces that are shaded (high-albedo materials can be applied to non-roof impervious surfaces to accentuate the reflectance of installed materials).
Conversion to residential and commercial use is likely to increase impervious surfaces and soil erosion rates.
Hygiene requires impervious surfaces that can be washed and do not allow the ingress of dirt.
The old 10-acre portion of the site lacks sufficient impervious surfaces to collect rain water that has mixed with metals from running off the site.
Storm-water runoff comes from impervious surfaces such as roofs and parking lots.
As the city of Portland is developed, impervious surfaces create increased amounts of stormwater runoff during rainfall events, disrupting the natural hydrologic cycle.
This first garden, in eliminating so much pavement, decreases the amount of impervious surfaces, which in turn improves watershed health, a crucial issue in the Chesapeake Bay region.