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import

1. 
a. goods (visible imports) or services (invisible imports) that are bought from foreign countries
b. (as modifier): an import licence
2. Canadian Informal a sportsman or -woman who is not native to the country in which he or she plays

import

(data)
To read data that is not in the native format of the application. For example, a web browser will have its own way of storing bookmarks but it will usually provide a function to import bookmarks from Internet Explorer. The alternative is to provide an independent external conversion utility but this is usually less convenient for the user.

import

(1) To convert a file into the format required by the application being used. Many applications are capable of importing a variety of popular formats, converting them into the native format of the application for display, printing or editing. If an application can import a format, it can usually export to the format (convert it back). For example, most word processing programs can import documents created in other word processors. After editing, they can be saved in the native format or saved in (exported to) the document's original format.

Computer-aided design (CAD) and drawing programs are used to manipulate graphics objects in their proprietary, native format. In order to modify an illustration created in another application, it must be imported. After making changes, the drawing can be saved in (exported to) the drawing's original format.

Ripping Is Importing Too
When a music CD is imported into jukebox software such as iTunes and converted to MP3, AAC or some other compressed audio format, it is also called "ripping." Contrast with export. See import filter and ripping.

(2) To scan an image into an application. For example, the import function in Photoshop is used to activate the scanner. In this context, import means to convert the paper image to a digital image.
References in periodicals archive ?
The detail shows that import of palm oil witnessed a sharp decrease of 10.99 per cent during July-April (2018-19) as it went down to $1.54 billion from $1.73 billion in July-April (2017-18).
In addition, the all-inclusive telecom imports in the country also witnessed a major decline of 8.86pc during July-March (2018-19) as compared to the same duration of the previous fiscal year.
On a year-on-year basis, the imports of mobile phones witnessed a decrease of 34.18pc during June 2019, when compared to the imports of the same month of last year.
This was followed by UAE, where from Pakistan imported goods worth $8866.813 million against the imports of $8900.158 million last year, showing negative growth of 0.37 percent.
Imports declined mainly because of decrease in arrival of furnace oil, machinery and electric equipment, palm oil and textiles.
On yearly basis, the import of food commodities and products dropped to $441.088 million in April 2019 against $485.86 million in same month of last year, showing a decrease of 9.22% whereas on monthly basis the import showed a growth of 12.3% as the imports during March 2019 stood at $392.824 million.
This incentivized imports but not all could make the season,' Mita President Jesus C.
Oil import bill rises 31% in 2018 !-- -- Danessa Rivera (The Philippine Star) - March 8, 2019 - 12:00am MANILA, Philippines Higher volume and import cost pushed the Philippine net oil import up by nearly a third last year.
The overall food imports into the country declined by 8.29 percent during the period under review.
Energy imports share increased to 23.7 percent of overall import bill of $60.86 billion in FY18 against 20.64 percent of total imports of $52.90 billion in FY17 according to data from Pakistan Bureau of Statistics (PBS), reported Express Tribune.
The share of energy imports increased to 23.7% in the total import bill amounting to $60.86 billion in fiscal year 2018, compared to 20.64% in the total of $52.90 billion in the previous fiscal year 2017, stated the Pakistan Bureau of Statistics (PBS) on Monday.
Meanwhile, the soyabean oil imports also increased from $112.533 million during FY2016-17 to $125.181 million in first eleven months of FY2017-18, showing growth of 11.24 percent.