Impost

(redirected from Imposts)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial.
Related to Imposts: Duty of Tonnage

impost

[′im‚pōst ‚ärch]
(architecture)
The highest part of a column, pillar, pier, or wall upon which the end of an arch rests.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Impost

The horizontal molding or capital on top of a pilaster, pier, or corbel which receives and distributes the thrust at the end of an arch.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

impost

1. A masonry unit or course, often distinctively profiled, which receives and distributes the thrust at each end of an arch. Also see abutment, springer.
2. A vertical member in a gemel or double window taking the place of a mullion; an integral mullion.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Assemb., Remarks on an Act Granting to Congress Certain Imposts and Duties (Feb.
The Constitution imposed two limits on state financial exactions: (1) a requirement of congressional consent before a state could "lay any Duty of Tonnage" (9) and (2) with one exception, a like requirement before a state could "lay any Imposts or Duties on Imports or Exports." (10) The Constitution also authorized Congress to impose financial exactions.
First, for an impost to satisfy the description of taxation in s 51(ii) of the Constitution it must be possible to distinguish it from an arbitrary exaction.
"Regulation of commerce" was also a synonym for nationalizing state imposts so that the revenue from import taxes could be used to pay war debts and not be limited to exclusively state purposes.
AVCC president Professor Schreuder said that at a time of growing international travel uncertainty associated with terrorism and SARS, Australian universities had hoped for, and expected, more than a $90 million impost on international education providers.
As with imposts, the states and not Congress regulated foreign commerce during the confederation period.
In addition to these outrageous imposts, the "Birzeit University Newsletter' for May of this year reports that Israeli officers at the border "add another tax, its rationale unknown, of over $10 for each Arabic book or periodical, a fee that is triple that of even last year.'
The second cost component delves with taxes and duties, to include: duties, excise tax, value-added tax (VAT) and other imposts.
The oil product consumers are the most punished sector with all the taxes and duties and special imposts on every liter of fuel products they buy.
The fuel imposts kicked up the prices of basic goods, leading to agitation for a raise in the minimum wage among labor groups and the introduction of legislation in the House of Representatives that would set a uniform base pay nationwide.
Duties included, but were not limited to, excises, imposts, and tonnage.
(13) Section 8 requires that all duties, imposts, and excises be uniform in rate throughout the United States.