deferred gratification

(redirected from Impulse control)
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deferred gratification

the conscious postponement of immediate emotional satisfaction in order to achieve longer-term goals. Such an orientation to longer-term goals is, for example, sometimes seen as an important dimension of educational achievement (see Bernstein, 1971).
References in periodicals archive ?
They focused on 1,580 reports of serious impulse control disorders and excluded cases involved in litigation or clinical studies.
This pattern was observed across all four impulse control disorders assessed: pathological gambling (3.
The short-term safety plan could be used as a means of fostering the students' development of impulse control and a sense of control in managing the self-injurious behaviors (Kehrberg, 1997).
CHRONIC Traumatic Encephalopathy causes memory loss, confusion, poor judgment, lack of impulse control, aggression, depression and eventually progressive dementia.
Before prescribing dopamine receptor agonists, physicians should warn patients and their families or caregivers of these drugs' potential to trigger uncontrollable gambling, sexual interests, spending, or other behavioral addictions, and should regularly query patients taking the drugs about conduct that could indicate development of an impulse control disorder.
In this guide for parents and professionals, the authors, both psychotherapists at The Yeager Center for Children and Families, explain how executive function skills (such as impulse control and goal orientation) develop in typical children and in children with behavior and attention problems, and present their original treatment and intervention approach based on enlisting the child as an active participant through play therapy and other techniques.
Follow-up analyses suggested that when older individuals (those in their late teens and early adult years) did better on the tests, it was because of improvements in impulse control, which may have allowed them to plan their solutions more fully before they acted.
This book explores the roots of meditation in yoga, Buddhism and Zen while providing neuroscientific research that supports its use to treat addictions, impulse control, mood and anxiety disorders and stress.
Weiss suggested that physicians be particularly vigilant with patients on dopaminergic therapies and those with preexisting impulse control disorders.
Results revealed that subjects who scored in the 90th percentile on measures of such qualities as dependability, impulse control, and ability to delay gratification were 89 percent less likely to develop AD than those with low scores in the 10th percentile for these conscientiousness traits.
Consumption of milk or dark chocolate showed improved impulse control and reaction time," they noted.
The most common is `Combined' type, where the child has poor attention and poor impulse control and is hyperactive.