filament lamp

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filament lamp

[′fil·ə·mənt ‚lamp]
(electricity)

incandescent lamp, incandescent filament lamp

incandescent lamp
A lamp from which light is emitted when a tungsten filament is heated to incandescence by an electric current.
References in periodicals archive ?
SWITCH's bulbs last up to 25 times longer than an incandescent light bulb - up to 25,000 hours - and the SWITCH60, for example, saves consumers approximately $130 on an energy bill over the light bulb's lifetime depending on usage.
Royal Philips Electronics has announced that it will continue its independent efforts to phase-out incandescent light bulbs in the GCC.
In 1979, one century after Edison developed the first practical incandescent light bulb, Conot noted: "Motion pictures are a $2 billion industry in the United States; phonograph and recording, $1.
The report examines the complete life cycles of three kinds of light bulbs: light-emitting diodes, also called LEDs, compact fluorescents, or CFLs, and traditional incandescent light bulbs.
It uses 18 watts, or 82% less energy than a comparable incandescent light bulb and 22%--30% less energy than a comparable compact fluorescent bulb.
The Milky Way's overall colour is about the shade of white halfway between an incandescent light bulb and the standard spectrum white on a TV.
Ever since Congress enacted legislation to phase out the incandescent light bulb, we've kept one eye on the prospects for the various kinds of lighting that are supposed to replace Thomas Edison's brightest idea.
It was the first house in the world to be lit by hydro-electricity, the first to use the incandescent light bulb, it boasts the world's first proto-steel bridge and one of the largest rock gardens in Europe.
Each bowl was randomly illuminated by warm, cool, or neutral white LEDs, by a tungsten-filament incandescent light bulb, or by a combination of four lasers (blue, red, green, yellow) tuned so their combination produced a white light.
Clearly, Thomas Edison's incandescent light bulb discovery was a landmark 19th century invention.
Blair Hopper, chief technology officer, and John Carnegie, strategic business consultant, oversaw the installation of the LED fixtures, each of which produces more light than a 100-watt incandescent light bulb, but only uses less electricity.
With the government mandated phasing out of the incandescent light bulb, I know people will be searching for a bulb that does a better job of giving them the same light quality they know and love.