filament lamp

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filament lamp

[′fil·ə·mənt ‚lamp]
(electricity)

incandescent lamp, incandescent filament lamp

incandescent lamp
A lamp from which light is emitted when a tungsten filament is heated to incandescence by an electric current.
References in periodicals archive ?
Far from being a spontaneous grassroots movement in favor of more energy efficiency, the eradication of incandescent light bulbs is actually being coordinated by a little-known initiative called en.
The Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources summarily decried Edison's innovation as being too inefficient in a drafted bill that will phase out the use of incandescent light bulbs beginning in the year 2012.
SWITCH LED bulbs provide the same warm, familiar glow of an incandescent light bulb with the same light output while using up to 80% less energy.
Royal Philips Electronics has announced that it will continue its independent efforts to phase-out incandescent light bulbs in the GCC.
The legislation favors the compact fluorescent, CFL, bulb, which is more expensive, but reportedly more efficient than the incandescent light bulb.
Downstairs I have three types: in the kitchen four halogen bulbs rated at 20W each; in the dining room (little used) an incandescent light bulb rated at 60W; and in the lounge a compact fluorescent bulb rated at 20W, which I think was stated as equivalent to a 100W incandescent bulb.
Take it home and replace one incandescent light bulb.
As the first major advance in electric lighting, the incandescent light bulb made its appearance in the early 1900s.
Turning off an incandescent light bulb starts saving energy after three seconds; halogen lights, after five minutes.
For example, the specific incandescent light bulb the team studied consumes 60 watts of electricity, while the LED model they studied uses just 12.
Although many think that American Thomas Edison invented the incandescent light bulb, the fact was that Swan and Edison were working neck and neck on opposite sides of the Atlantic, with Swan pipping Edison at the post.
By the end of 1879, Edison had developed the first practical incandescent light bulb after a long period of trial and error that gave proof to his much-quoted adage that "genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration.