incipient species


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incipient species

[in′sip·ē·ənt ¦spē·shēz]
(evolution)
Populations that are in the process of diverging to the point of speciation but still have the potential to interbreed.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Existing models have, however, failed to demonstrate how more than one incipient species could persist in a sympatric population at equilibrium when the environment is homogeneous.
It was Darwin (1871) who first stressed the importance of sexual selection in the divergence of incipient species, or the formation of races, and Fisher (1930) who stressed the potential of reproduction to promote genetic instabilities as a first step in the fission of species.
Mating is usually one of the main behaviors capable of producing prezygotic reproductive isolation between incipient species (Spieth and Ringo 1983; Coyne 1992).
The three mating components are frequently used to study mate choice and sexual selection within species but may also be applied to situations of incipient species (Spieth and Ringo 1983).
A review of the kinds of evidence that might distinguish primary from secondary zones, and therefore clarify the origin of incipient species, would have been a useful addition to this book.
Range expansion likely would have been characteristic of those peripherally isolated, incipient species that survived, thereby obscuring evidence of their peripheral isolation.
An important difference between Mayr and Dobzhansky was their appraisal of reinforcement, the idea that natural selection can directly increase reproductive isolation between two incipient species that become sympatric.