incisor

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incisor

a chisel-edged tooth at the front of the mouth. In man there are four in each jaw

incisor

[in′sīz·ər]
(anatomy)
A tooth specialized for cutting, especially those in front of the canines on the upper jaw of mammals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Occlusal edges were removed from incisors and one to two millimeters were removed from the top of premolars and molars before grinding briefly on 600 and 1200 mesh diamond sanding discs.
Absent central incisor Patient 2, an 11 year old boy, presented missing the maxillary right permanent central incisor (FDI 11) which had been lost due to trauma approximately two years previously.
The marks show the scoop-like, U-shaped cross-section typical of lower incisors rather than the flat-edged cross-section left by upper incisors (Burns et al.
His diagnosis at age 16 years included maxillary hypoplasia, class III occlusion, bilateral oronasal fistulas, bilateral alveolar clefts, and missing maxillary lateral incisors (Figures 5, 6a).
A zebra uses these incisors to clip off grass as it grazes.
The two teeth on either side of your incisors are called canines (KAY-nines).
Fractured incisors can be restored with a bonding technique or crown.
Rodents, such as mice, gerbils, and hamsters, have large incisors.
A resulting muscle imbalance from the continual forced realignment of the incisors must gradually have forced the living bone of the skull into its observed asymmetrical form, and accounted for the observed evidence of preferential mastication on the right side.
Researchers have noted that tooth decay is seldom seen in teeth which are located where saliva is most abundant, such as the lower incisors, that most cavities occur in pits and fissures and interproximal surfaces where saliva has poor access, and that a reduction in the amount of saliva present in the mouth, xerostomia, results in a sharp increase in tooth decay.
Curator of mammals, Tim Rowlands, said: "Rock hyraxes and elephants have similar toes, teeth and skull structures and rock hyraxes also have two large continually growing incisors, which correspond to an elephant's tusks.
INCISORS With a chisel-like cutting edge for biting, the upper incisors - front teeth - slightly overlap the lower incisors when the jaws are closed.