income

(redirected from Income elasticity)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial.

income

1. the amount of monetary or other returns, either earned or unearned, accruing over a given period of time
2. receipts; revenue
References in periodicals archive ?
Variables representing the interaction of ethnicity and TQE were created to evaluate differences in income elasticity between African-Americans and Caucasians and Hispanics and Caucasians (see Dorsett, Durand, and Wagner 1998).
11) In the reduced model the income elasticity of demand is 0.
The different income elasticity results reported between the cross-border tourism expenditure study by Di Matteo and Di Matteo (1993) and the summary presented by Eadington and Redman (1991) suggest the need for analyzing the nature of the expenditures involved.
3 It is crucial that the income elasticity is unity.
It would also appear that if the income elasticity of demand for good 2 was larger than for good 1 the relative price of good 1 may decline.
We have argued that education is a 'superior' good--its income elasticity of demand is greater than one--and that there is currently an unsatisfied demand for education.
Sensitivity tests were also performed on the income elasticity of labor supply, including the case in which the labor supply curve bends backwards.
This implies that the income elasticity of medical care is less than one.
We then explore the sensitivity of our results to alternative scenarios that change supply-side pressure for spending growth, make different assumptions about employer dropping, modify the income elasticity of demand, and alter outside financing for health care expenses.
The general connection between the shape of an Engel curve and the income elasticity of the respective good can easily be illustrated.
Because changes in tax policy affect taxpayers' incentives in a variety of ways, including their desire to work and save and their decisions to report taxable income, one crucial modeling assumption in this exercise is the assumed taxable income elasticity (ETI).
0]% in the number of cigarettes consumed in a quarter, while the short-term income elasticity ([[gamma].