Inconel

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Inconel

 

a heat-resistant alloy based on nickel, containing approximately 15 percent chromium and up to 9 percent iron. It was developed in the USA, where it is manufactured in a number of varieties that are alloyed with aluminum, titanium, molybdenum, and other metals depending on use. Inconel is used as a construction material for components of gas-turbine engines, supersonic aircraft, rockets, and the like. The alloys are characterized by high durability and impact strength at temperatures up to 900°C and by insensitivity to gashes at low temperatures (to −78°C). Products made of Inconel are readily joined by welding; welded structures are subjected to heat treatment in order to increase durability. The alloy grades KhN80TBIu and KhN73MBTIu made in the USSR resemble Inconel.

References in periodicals archive ?
When asked whether he was being inconsistent by maintaining that Inconel 600 was the best known material available for the nuclear steam generators despite a number of tests in which Inconel 600 had been cracked in pure water, he replied, "Absolutely not.
Latanision admitted that Inconel 600 tubes cracked, but said, "I can make any metal crack.
He also admitted that Westinghouse had not conducted any testing of corrosion on the outside of the Inconel 600 until 1967, after the contract for the Beaver Valley Unit One was executed.
Whyte was asked about the results of Westinghouse tests which showed that the addition of lead to water through the generators would cause "extensive, severe cracking of Inconel 600.
He insisted that these tests indicated no problem with Inconel 600.
Whyte's initial testimony Wednesday focused on a series of tests he conducted on Inconel 600 and other materials throughout the 1950's, 60's and 70's.
He also discussed the French testing of Inconel 600 in which the Inconel tubing was cracked in pure water.
Begley was questioned about a 1974 symposium at Ohio State University in which he said a panel of experts agreed that there was "no magic alloy, no magic environment that is compatible with the system required, but that Inconel 600 was the best material available.
He testified that the use of Inconel 600 was a defect because it is "prone to corrosion and cracking in the operating environment at the Beaver Valley Nuclear Plant.
Staehle noted that the temperature of 607 degrees Fahrenheit at which the Beaver Valley Nuclear Power plant operates significantly exceeds the 500 degree Fahrenheit threshold for cracking of Inconel 600.
Then on the other hand, contrary to Westinghouse claims in a 1970 test by the Westinghouse Canada research group, he said those test results showed a rapid propagation of stress corrosion cracking in Inconel 600 and that the cracks had penetrated half the way through the tube walls.