Indiaman

(redirected from Indiamen)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Indiaman

(formerly) a large merchant ship engaged in trade with India
References in periodicals archive ?
(89) A particularly important innovation pioneered by the Dutch was their use of the Roaring Forties, the strong westerly winds in the southern hemisphere, as a route for their East Indiamen in the Indian Ocean.
It is the first collective biography ever of commanders of East Indiamen of a European nation in the early modern period.
If the wages and conditions were right, and the captain did not have the name of a "tartar," such men were as likely to be found working on American slave ships as on Danish whalers, English merchantmen, French warships, or Dutch East Indiamen. (69) Carl Ortmann, who was executed for conspiracy to mutiny on the Dutch man-of-war Utrecht in 1798 was typical of these ocean-wandering laborers: born in Danzig, he had served in the French navy, been imprisoned by the British, and was hanged for plotting a violent, treasonous mutiny on a Dutch warship.
On top is a ship, an East Indiamen, floating on a globe of the world.
At times, naus (armed Indiamen) on the monsoon trip from home would be requested to assist in missions while they were in Goa.
This authoritative and readable history tracks the passage and hardships of Indiamen merchant ships sailing from India to England.
The island was once a vital and busy port of call for East Indiamen returning from the Orient and later the tea and wool clippers - buy it became a backwater once the Suez Canal was opened.
The vessels came in all shapes and sizes ( barques, brigs, brigantines, packets, schooners, ketches, sloops and Indiamen.
This figure is certainly exaggerated but for many Indiamen arriving from Portugal, Mozambique provided the first landfall in six months and there were many sick on board.
"East Indiamen" employed by Britain and Continental Europe were commonly 1,000 tons or more, while the Experiment, the second American vessel to sail directly to China, was only eighty-five tons.
Returning fleets of East Indiamen moored in Blackwall Reach, before their Indian and Chinese cargoes were transferred via hoys and carts to enormous warehouses where they awaited distribution and sale in Britain's burgeoning consumer markets.