ashwagandha

(redirected from Indian ginseng)
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ashwagandha

ashwagandha

One of the world’s most renowned herbs. Adaptogenic nightshade from India in the pepper family, known as "Indian ginseng", provides energy and a rejuvenating lift while at the same time calming and soothing the nerves. Chemically similar to ginseng, yet superior in relieving stress. Roots used to make famous medicinal powder. Great for exhaustion from physical and mental strain, stress-related ulcers, nervous exhaustion, depression. Helps boost thyroid hormone and adrenals to prevent stress-caused thyroid burnout. Popular aphrodisiac, increasing libido and performance in 75% of men who use it. Estrogen-like effect that stops internal bleeding, excessive uterine bleeding, hemorrhoids and also hemorrhagic dysentery (bloody diarrhea). For fatigue, chronic disease, impotence, memory, arthritic inflammation, rheumatic pain, anxiety, insomnia, respiratory disorders, nervous disorders, gynecological disorders, uterine infections, nerve impulses, sex-enhancing, erectile dysfunction, female and male fertility, cancer, increases hemoglobin, circulation, nutrient absorption, liver and kidney tonic, clears the mind, strengthens nerves, promotes restful sleep, lessens graying of the hair, increases performance in athletes, balances hormones, hypertension, anti-aging. The whole plant is useable. It grows as a short shrub (30 inches ,75 cm) with a central stem from which branches extend radially in a star pattern, covered with fuzzy wooly hairs. Small green flowers, ripe fruit is orange-red and has milk-coagulating properties.
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In the first set of experiments, liquid extracts of Asian, American, or Indian ginseng were added to drug-free serum to achieve concentrations mimicking in vivo concentration range expected after recommended use and severe overdose.
The half-life of digoxin-like immunoreactive components was relatively shorter with Indian ginseng compared with both Asian and American ginsengs, indicating that metabolites of such ginseng may also interfere with the FPIA assay.
Reported toxicity of Asian ginseng and unknown toxicity of recently available Indian ginseng prevented performing any experiments involving human volunteers.
We evaluated potential interference of Asian, American, and Indian ginsengs on serum digoxin measurement both in vitro and in vivo in a mouse model with the ECLIA-digoxin assay and a turbidimetric assay (TIA) on Bayer's ADVIA Chemistry systems and compared the results with the results obtained by using FPIA.
In another experiment, separate aliquots of another drug-free serum pool were supplemented with Asian, American, and Indian ginsengs (60 [micro]L/mL of serum) to study protein binding of digoxin-like immunoreactive components of various ginsengs.
In a different experiment, the effect of Asian, American, and Indian ginsengs on serum digoxin measurement was studied by supplementing aliquots of 2 digoxin pools with various ginsengs.