Indian summer


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Indian summer

a period of unusually settled warm weather after the end of summer proper

Indian summer

[′in·dē·ən ′səm·ər]
(climatology)
A period, in mid-or late autumn, of abnormally warm weather, generally clear skies, sunny but hazy days, and cool nights; in New England, at least one killing frost and preferably a substantial period of normally cool weather must precede this warm spell in order for it to be considered a true Indian summer; it does not occur every year, and in some years there may be two or three Indian summers; the term is most often heard in the northeastern United States, but its usage extends throughout English-speaking countries.

Indian summer

a period of mild, dry weather occurring in U.S. and Canada in late autumn. [Am. Culture: Misc.]
See: Autumn
References in periodicals archive ?
Indian summer, says Wikipedia, is a period of warm dry weather between the middle of September and the first of November.
But here in Wales, expectations were never so great, as our Indian Summer - Haf Bach Mihangel (St Michael's Little Summer) - ended six weeks earlier on St Michael's Day, September 29.
Designs like chikankari that form the very essence of Indian summer stand out only in white.
The phrase Indian summer has nothing to do with India - it was first used by British settlers in America's New England to describe fine autumns when native Indians collected food for winter.
Indian Summer is, in the end, a humane book, genuine in feeling, its author's view of life honestly rendered.
Our view is the Indian summer we had really wrapped up the red wine story at the end of vintage to be a magic result," he said, noting conditions were especially good in the premium wine regions of Padthaway and Coonawarra in South Australia.
But despite speculation, this is not what could be officially classified as an Indian Summer.
An Indian summer is when it's much warmer than average after the first frost of the year.
British Weather Services senior meteorologist Jim Dale added: "Just when you thought summer was all over, an Indian summer is incoming.
However those hoping for an Indian Summer may be disappointed as a low pressure system is expected to start to move in from the west over the weekend, bringing the risk of some rain.
AFTER a wet summer, the North East could finally be getting some sunshine - but don't call it an Indian Summer.
However, after a damp couple of months, we could be in for an Indian summer later in September.

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