Indian

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Indian

1. a native, citizen, or inhabitant of the Republic of India
2. an American Indian
3. any of the languages of the American Indians

Indian

(Buddhist) architecture (300 B.C.–320 A.D.)
1.
The earliest surviving buildings are of timber and mud-brick construction, of which the stupa is the most characteristic; it is a hemispherical mound with a processional path around the perimeter and elaborately carved gateways. The most typical is the stupa at Sanchi. In rock-cut Buddhist temples, the main forms and details follow early wooden prototypes, with elaborately carved stone shrines in which the exterior is more important than the interior.
2.
All types of temples in this style consist of a small unlit shrine crowned by a spire and preceded by one or more porch-like halls, used for religious dancing and music. The stone was laid up rough-cut and carved in place by Hindu sculptors who treated every element on every surface as unique, using the repetition of sculptural forms to achieve a unifying context. There was no attempt to evolve a style or to perfect any particular pillar or column.
3.
The Hindu and Buddhist religions had a strong influence on Far East temple architecture. One of the most well known and representative sites is Angkor Wat located in Cambodia, a temple complex of shrines that was intended as a funerary monument. It is perhaps one of the world’s largest religious structures and was conceived as a “temple mountain” within an enormous enclosure and surrounded by a wide moat. A monumental causeway, framed by giant mythical serpents, leads to the entrance gate. The temple is built on a series of stepped terraces, surrounded by towers at each corner. Vaulted galleries receive light from an open colonnade illuminating the continuous relief friezes which adorn the inner walls. The central sanctuary is a large pagoda-like tower on top of a stepped pyramid. It is joined by passageways to towers at each of the four corners at the base.
4.
An architecture in which temples are enclosed shrines preceded by an open porch, which is often elaborately carved. They have a lighter appearance and are more elegant than Hindu temples.

Indian

[′in·dē·ən]
(astronomy)
References in periodicals archive ?
critique of Indianisation is that it tends to deny any agency to
of Southeast Asian cultures within the Indianisation framework have
whole problem of Indianisation as developing out of a false dichotomy
Since traditional ideas of Indianisation have been largely discarded, it therefore begs the question as to how this art form arose.
The scholarship before tectonic plate theory tended to see Ratu Kidul as 'an ancient Javanese chthonic Mother-goddess', identified in the era of Indianisation with the Saivite high goddess Durga or the Majapahit royal ancestress Rajapatni.
Chatterjee theorised that there had been a wholesale Indianisation of Southeast Asia.
Glover and Beilina emphasise that such links started long before the so-called Indianisation period.
14) In fact, in a range of recent scholarship, Indian colonialist and Indianisation models are no longer given the weight they were throughout much of the twentieth century.