Indigoid Dyes

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Indigoid Dyes

 

a group of vat dyes closely resembling indigo in structure and used to dye cellulose and protein fibers as well as for cotton printing. These dyes cover a broad range of the color spectrum, from orange to black. Their resistance to light and water are rather high but inferior to that of polycyclic dyes. Indigo and thioindigo are characteristic indigoid dyes. The range of indigoid dyes was considerably extended at the beginning of the 20th century. Subsequently some of them were replaced by other classes of dyes; 15-20 indigoid dyes are still used. The manufacture of indigoid dyes is a complex, multistage process. The starting compounds are various derivatives of aniline, naphthalene, and other substances.

REFERENCES

Kogan, I. M. Khimiia krasitelei. Moscow, 1956.
Venkataraman K. Khimiia sinteticheskikh krasitelei, vol. 2. Leningrad, 1957. (Translated from English.)
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
HPLC analysis of the natural scale insect, madder, and indigoid dyes. J.
The chemical composition of the indigoid dyes derived from the hypobranchial glandular secretions of Murex mollusks.