Indio


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Indio

(ĭn`dē-ō'), city (1990 pop. 36,793), Riverside co., SE Calif., in the Coachella ValleyCoachella Valley
, arid region, SE Calif., N of the Salton Sea. Water is brought into the region by artesian wells and by the Coachella Canal (123 mi/198 km long), a branch of the All-American Canal built between 1938 and 1948; more than 100,000 acres (40,500 hectares) have been
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 of the Colorado Desert, 22 ft (6.7 m) below sea level; founded 1876, inc. 1930. It is the trade and administrative center for a citrus, grape, cotton, grain, and poultry area. Indio is also the center of one of the largest date-producing areas in the United States, and the National Date Festival is held there. The Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival is also held in Indio. The area benefited from the regional growth of the electronics and aircraft industries in the 1980s and 90s, and more recently from the development of resorts and retirement communities. Joshua Tree National Park is nearby.
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References in periodicals archive ?
'The initial response of the indio to evangelization was intimate, personal...
Undated picture distributed on Feb 15, 2019 by Peruvian news agency Andina of a recently discovered burial chamber belonging to the Inca period at the "Mata Indio" archeological site in Lambayeque region, Peru.
The two sisters were photographed together in Indio, California, ahead of a full weekend of musical acts including Beyonce, Cardi B and The Weeknd.
Indio provides a workflow management platform that is claimed to allow insurance agents and brokers to spend less time on routine tasks.
La segunda recoge los textos coloniales como evidencia en la construccion del indio como sujeto subalterno siguiendo un enfoque postcolonial en directa tension con el indigenismo (Rivera Cusicanqui 2010).
This fascinating work of nonfiction represents one journalist's quest to discover how seven thousand bicycles wound their way through a surprising number of hands to wind up abandoned just across the border from Tijuana, centered on a mysterious figure named El Indio. Kimball Taylor's gift at capturing human stories in a manner as captivating as fiction transforms this Quixotic journey into a landmark work on the recent history of human smuggling into the United States.