induced movement

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induced movement

[in‚düst ′müv·mənt]
(psychology)
The perceived movement of a stationary object when its frame of reference moves.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Numerous factors are related to the susceptibility and severity of visually induced motion sickness (VIMS) [32][33][34], including the sensation of illusory self-motion [35][36][37], gender [38], age [39], or personality factors like neuroticism and anxiety [40].
A prospective crossover observational study on visually induced motion sickness.
experiments of flow induced motion of circular cylinder with passive turbulence control at 35,000 [less than or equal to] Re [less than or equal to] 130,000," in Proceedings of the ASME 201130th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering, vol.
Recent discoveries in this field concern the interplay of several distinct spin orbit coupling derived phenomena that, together, allow for the highly efficient current induced motion of domain walls (DWs) in magnetic nanowires.
Handheld camerawork induced motion sickness, festival audience members fainted and the filmmakers milked each nugget of publicity with ghoulish glee.
It covers the history and concept, mooring and anchor design, global motion analysis and numerical model, vortex induced motion, and model testing and field data.
In vivo skeletal responses to porous-surfaced implants subjected to small induced motion. J Bone Joint Surg Am.
Peristaltic induced motion of a MHD third grade fluidin a deformable tube.
The wave induced motion of the joints is resisted by hydraulic rams, which pump high-pressure fluid through hydraulic motors via smoothing accumulators.
Although we learned in school that magnets were always bipolar and so magnetically induced motion would always end in a locked state of equilibrium, Minato explains that he has finetuned the positioning of the magnets and the timing of pulses to the stators to the point where the repulsion between the rotor and the stator (the fixed outer magnetic ring) is transitory.
This phenomenon, called visually induced motion sickness (VIMS), has been reported in a variety of virtual environments, such as fixed-base flight and automobile simulation (Frank, Casali, & Wierwille, 1988; Regan & Price, 1994; Yoo, Lee, & Jones, 1997) and in a variety of nonvehicular simulations (DiZio & Lackner, 1992; Ellis, 1991).