induction burner

(redirected from Induction cooker)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

induction burner

[in′dək·shən ‚bər·nər]
(engineering)
Fuel-air burner into which the fuel is fed under pressure to entrain needed air into the combustion nozzle area.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, Marcel Pavilion was decorated with 72 models of LED and Smart TVs; 6 models of microwave ovens, pressure cookers and irons; 27 models of LPG and NG-run single and double burners' gas stoves; 24 models of LED lights; 14 models of blenders; 9 models of rechargeable table fans; 7 models of rechargeable batteries; 5 models of electric kettles, kitchen cookware and ceiling fans; 4 models of room heater; 2 models of voltage stabilizers and auto voltage protectors, washing machine, induction cooker and wall fan.
For example, when we saw how much energy our old halogen cooker was using, we got a new induction cooker. We're very pleased that we're saving money, but we're also keen to leave the planet in good condition for the next generation and getting a smart meter is one way that we can make a contribution to a better energy future.
If you have a table top induction cooker, you can cook this right at the dining table.
In Indian context most of the consumers are well acquainted with the concept of induction cooker, but the biggest handicap in case of other induction cookers is utensils.
An induction cooker, which offers controlled and customizable cooking functions, can help make your life easier, too.
Induction cooker. Using the same pot and the same temperature and quantity of water, the burner used 1,300 watts at its highest setting and took 5 minutes and 50 seconds to bring the water to boil.
The fitted kitchen and diner once again is spacious and besides a good range of wall and base units and worktops offers plenty of space for appliances and an electric induction cooker point with a hood over.
The official said recently gold was smuggled in the form of biscuits weighing 116 grams each inside inverter, dumb bells, battery, transformer, induction cooker, transformer coil, electric hot plate, meat cutter, torch and the like.
If you don't have an induction cooker, you can still do your bit by cooking food in large batches - which can be frozen later; cutting up ingredients in smaller pieces for faster cooking; and keeping pots and pans covered to reduce heat loss.