InfoWindow

InfoWindow

An earlier trade name for IBM display screens.
References in periodicals archive ?
An infowindow allows collecting qualitative information for a documented location.
The footprints contain the original crowdsourced message submitted by a user, displayed in a Google Maps API infoWindow. The success of our geographic information retrieval methods can be improved by refining geographic relationships, such as proximity and containment, to increase the precision of incident and obstacle locations and general points of interests and by developing appropriate measures of confidence, such as those describe by Larson (2011) and Andogah, Bouma, and Nerbonne (2012).
The program runs on the IBM Infowindow system, with a personal computer interfaced to the videodisc player and controlled by the student using the touch screen on the computer.
The networked classrooms use numerous printers along with a total of 37 IBM PS/2s and 37 Mac SEs, while the drop-in labs have a total of six CAD workstations, eight Mac SEs, 60 IBM PS/2s and six IBM InfoWindow interactive videodisc systems used for multimedia training.
IBM in its Atlanta multimedia operation emphasized the PS/2 for analog and digital video, still pictures and digital audio, and announced its support of independent software providers for each element, including the InfoWindow authoring system for interactive video-disc, M Motion Video Adapter to digitize analog video and produce interactive video, and the Intel Action Media DVI board set.
Since '86, IBM has been marketing the Infowindow system, a touchscreen-controlled computer and video disk combination.
In 1986 IBM announced the InfoWindow display, which mixed video and computer graphics on a touch-sensitive screen; and in 1989 they announced the M-Motion adapter, which eliminated the need for a special monitor and replaced touch with a mouse interface.
IBM's commitment to multimedia dates from the early 1980s, when it began development of the pioneering InfoWindow platform.
Labs are equipped with Sony VIEW System workstations with the following basic system configuration: An IBM-compatible 286-based computer, 1.44MB floppy disk drive, a 40- or 1000MB hard drive, 640K RAM, 256K video RAM, MS-DOS with IBM Infowindow emulation software and a 13" Sony Multiscan monitor.
It also supports courseware titles designed for IBM's InfoWindow system.
The DOS machines had VGA graphics and the PS/2 used InfoWindow with touch-screen interaction.
has announced that Version 3.2 of its VirtualVideo Producer (VVP) multimedia development package is compatible with IBM InfoWindow hardware.