Ingersoll, Jared

Ingersoll, Jared,

1722–81, American colonial official, b. Milford, Conn. He was made (1751) king's attorney in New Haven, and later he sailed (1758) for England as a colonial agent. From a second trip (1763) he returned (1765) with a commission to distribute stamps under the highly unpopular Stamp ActStamp Act,
1765, revenue law passed by the British Parliament during the ministry of George Grenville. The first direct tax to be levied on the American colonies, it required that all newspapers, pamphlets, legal documents, commercial bills, advertisements, and other papers
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. A mob, led by John DurkeeDurkee, John
, 1728–82, American pioneer and Revolutionary officer, b. Windham, Conn. Durkee, a leading member of the Connecticut Sons of Liberty, led the group that forced Jared Ingersoll to resign at the time of the Stamp Act.
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, forced Ingersoll to resign. He was later crown judge of the Philadelphia vice-admiralty court until, in the American Revolution, Loyalist-hunting colonials forced him to return to New Haven. His son, Jared IngersollIngersoll, Jared,
1749–1822, American jurist, b. New Haven, Conn.; son of Jared Ingersoll (1722–81) and father of Charles Jared Ingersoll. After studying law in England, he was admitted (1773) to the bar in Philadelphia and became a leading attorney; he later argued
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, however, supported the Revolution.

Bibliography

See biography by L. H. Gipson (1920, repr. 1971).


Ingersoll, Jared,

1749–1822, American jurist, b. New Haven, Conn.; son of Jared IngersollIngersoll, Jared,
1722–81, American colonial official, b. Milford, Conn. He was made (1751) king's attorney in New Haven, and later he sailed (1758) for England as a colonial agent.
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 (1722–81) and father of Charles Jared IngersollIngersoll, Charles Jared
, 1782–1862, American political leader and author, b. Philadelphia; son of Jared Ingersoll (1749–1822). In several influential publications, including Inchiquin: The Jesuit's Letters on American Literature and Politics
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. After studying law in England, he was admitted (1773) to the bar in Philadelphia and became a leading attorney; he later argued many important cases before the U.S. Supreme Court. He served (1780–81) in the Continental Congress and was (1787) a delegate to the Federal Constitutional Convention. In Pennsylvania he was attorney general (1790–99, 1811–17), U.S. district attorney (1800–1801), and presiding judge (1821–22) of the district court of Philadelphia co. In 1812 he was the unsuccessful candidate for Vice President, running on the antiwar Republican and Federalist ticket headed by De Witt ClintonClinton, De Witt
, 1769–1828, American statesman, b. New Windsor, N.Y.; son of James Clinton. He was admitted (1790) to the New York bar but soon became secretary to his uncle, George Clinton, first governor of the state, and in that position (1790–95) gained
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.

Bibliography

See H. Binney, The Leaders of the Old Bar of Philadelphia (1859).

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