inhalant

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Related to Inhalant abuse: huffing

inhalant

1. (esp of a volatile medicinal formulation) inhaled for its soothing or therapeutic effect
2. an inhalant medicinal formulation
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In a press briefing about inhalant abuse, neither Dr.
Of particular concern is that the percentage of teens reporting that they "strongly agree" that inhalant abuse can be deadly declined 19% since 2001, with only 64% of respondents in the 2005 survey agreeing that inhalants can kill.
One of ACE's ongoing missions is to educate adults on the symptoms, warning signs and dangers of inhalant abuse. This past summer it developed a more formal alliance with the Partnership for Drug Free America (PDFA) and plans to spend 2005 spreading the word through public service announcements and print media.
What Are The Medical Consequences of Inhalant Abuse?
The best way to prevent inhalant abuse is to educate your child about how harmful these products are.
Although about 75% of parents reported discussing cigarettes "a lot" with their children, only 50% reported spending the same amount of time discussing the risks of inhalant abuse.
20, CSPA president Chris Cathcart addressed concerns about rising inhalant abuse. The CSPA established the Alliance for Consumer Education in 1999 with partners such as the American Association of Poison Control Centers to send messages to teens about the dangers of inhalant abuse.
Inhalant abuse is very serious and potentially life-threatening.
Data showed that teens are four times more likely to report inhalant abuse than parents expect.
But the prevalence of inhalant abuse in the past year by 16- and 17-year-olds increased slightly, from 0.6% in 2002 to 1% in 2003.
Overall, 40% of those with inhalant abuse or dependence also met criteria for major depression, highlighting the need to screen adolescents in treatment for inhalant abuse for depression and other mood disorders.
But the prevalence of inhalant abuse in the past year by 16- and 17-year-olds in creased slightly, from 0.6% in 2002 to 1% in 2003.