Injun Joe

Injun Joe

stabs town doctor to death. [Am. Lit.: Tom Sawyer]
See: Murder
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Say, Huck, I know another o' them voices; it's Injun Joe."
Potter and Injun Joe were carrying a handbarrow with a rope and a couple of shovels on it.
"Yes, and you done more than that," said Injun Joe, approaching the doctor, who was now standing.
Injun Joe sprang to his feet, his eyes flaming with passion, snatched up Potter's knife, and went creeping, catlike and stooping, round and round about the combatants, seeking an opportunity.
Presently, when the moon emerged again, Injun Joe was standing over the two forms, contemplating them.
Where I found fun, her attention ran to the confusion, conflict, and bloody violence on display in the action of the novel, and most especially in the at once frightening and pitiable figure of Injun Joe. He murders Dr.
Injun Joe, the actual murderer, tries to kill Tom during the hearing in court and makes a hasty exit.
We were introduced to the splendour of the Mississippi and the Great Outdoors by Tom Sawyer, Huck Finn and Injun Joe.
Pictured, left to right, hiding behind gravestones are Tom Sawyer played by Andrew Craig, Huckleberry Finn (Christopher Atkinson), while Injun Joe, played by Steven Close, is about to murder Dr Robinson (Matthew Reynolds) bottom left after knocking out Muff Potter, played by Stephen Heatley.
Though The Fantasticks isn't 1/100th nearly as good, where would Tom Sawyer be without Injun Joe or The Merchant of Venice be without Shylock?
Various songs from this record, including "Injun Joe," "Papa Poppa," a rock ode about cults, the autobiographical numbers "Back to My Music," and "The Songwriter," and the blues title track, received airplay around the country on FM radio.
(He has also changed "Injun Joe" to "Indian Joe" and "half-breed" to "half-blood.")