ISS

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Related to Injury Severity Score: abbreviated injury scale

ISS

1. Abbrev. for interstellar scintillation. See scattering.
2. Abbrev. for International Space Station.

ISS

References in periodicals archive ?
001 (range) (*) t-test; AIS = Abbreviated Injury Scale; ISS = Injury Severity Score Table 4.
The ability of our aged patient-specific risk tool to outperform the widely used Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS) index to predict inpatient mortality within a nationwide patient cohort confirms its utility.
Abbreviations: AIS = Abbreviated Injury Scale, CI = confidence interval, EMED = Expeditionary Medical Encounter Database, GLM = general linear model, ICD-9-CM = International Classification of Diseases-9th Revision-Clinical Modification, ISS = Injury Severity Score, LEAP = Lower Extremity Assessment Project, NHRC = Naval Health Research Center, PTSD = posttraumatic stress disorder, TBI = traumatic brain injury, VA = Department of Veterans Affairs.
Demographics such as age, gender, mechanism of injury, complications, Injury Severity score (ISS), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), ICU--length of stay (LOS), and mortality were analyzed among trauma patients who need re-intubation within 48 hrs after extubation (group 1) compared to successfully extubated (group 2).
The classification of injuries by type and severity according to the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) forms the basis of several commonly used measures of overall injury severity such as the Injury Severity Score (ISS) (Baker et al.
Trauma patients were also divided into new injury severity score (NISS) less than 20, and NISS > 20 to stratify the severity of injury as mild or severe.
The injury severity score (ISS), the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores, and the presence of multiple trauma (polytrauma) were noted.
Usefulness of the abbreviated injury score and the injury severity score in comparison to the Glasgow coma scale in predicting outcome after traumatic brain injury.
9%); patients who died had a significantly higher Injury Severity Score (p<0.
Severity measures included the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and the Injury Severity Score (ISS).
Patients demographics like age, gender, injury severity score, length of intensive care unit and hospital stay, complications, and type of pain control used (epidural analgesia or intravenous opioid) were recorded.
The following data was collected by a full-time dedicated data collector: patients' demographics including age and gender; Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II (32) score; GCS (33) score; Injury Severity Score (34); associated injuries; admission category (non-operative vs postoperative); and the presence of ICP monitoring.