ISS

(redirected from Injury Severity Score)
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Related to Injury Severity Score: abbreviated injury scale

ISS

1. Abbrev. for interstellar scintillation. See scattering.
2. Abbrev. for International Space Station.

ISS

References in periodicals archive ?
8 times greater likelihood to die after being injured than lean patients (BMI [less than or equal to] 25) with similar injury severity scores (ISS) [10].
1,2,5) The patients in the epidural group had significantly more rib fractures and were significantly older, but there were no differences between the groups with respect to gender, body weight, mode of injury, injury severity score, presence of flail segment, lung contusion and placement of chest tube.
Additionally, we evaluated the notion that patients with alcohol involvement may have had falsely inflated injury severity scores (ISSs), because the effects of alcohol, such as incoherence and reduced motor function, may have been attributed to head injury.
The trauma registry was reviewed for demographic data, mechanism of injury, Abbreviated Injury Scores (AIS), Injury Severity Score (ISS), and mortality.
The overall mean Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 29 (of a possible 50) (Arch.
Data synthesis was possible for 350 participants with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) [greater than or equal to] 16 who underwent early sCD62L testing.
The TRISS method gives a physiological and anatomical index of injury severity based on the Injury Severity Score (ISS), the Revised Trauma Score (RTS), the patient's age and whether the injury was blunt or penetrating (Woodford, 2001:5).
Rutledge and Osler (1998) created an International Classification of Diseases Injury Severity Score (IGISS) and adapted it to predict LOS for injured patients.
We extracted: (i) patient demographics: age, gender, mechanism of injury, injury severity score (ISS) and site of referral (scene or IHT); (ii) initial lactate value; (iii) presence of rib fractures (single and multiple fractures were included), pulmonary contusion, flail segments, sternal fracture or blunt aortic injury; (iv) other system injuries, which were divided into head, face, spine, abdomen, limb (either single or multiple) and external; (v) length of stay in the TICU; and (vi) in-hospital mortality and cause of death.
The EMED uses clinical encounter forms to capture patient data, including time of arrival at treatment facilities, mechanism of injury, Injury Severity Score (ISS) (based on Abbreviated Injury Scale scores assigned by EMED clinicians) [34], and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores.
Investigators also reported a statistically significant correlation between patients' oxidation-reduction potential levels and injury severity as measured by the validated Injury Severity Score (ISS; p=0.