Coprinus

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Coprinus

 

a genus of hymenomycetous gill fungi. The fruiting body is slender and delicate. At maturity, the cap deliquesces into a black fluid, which was formerly used instead of ink. The mushrooms grow on rich humus and dung; occasionally they grow on trees and wood. The common inky cap (Coprinus atramentarius) and the shaggy mane (C. comatus) are often found in gardens and parks.

References in periodicals archive ?
Some of his favourite facts and fables come from the alternative uses for fungi, for example the Ink Caps, which release their spores to reproduce and then liquefy, becoming a black mess within a few hours.
Offerings can include ceps, diced and deep-fried, mixed mushroom patties or shaggy ink caps (the "lawyers' wigs" which must be eaten in their young dome shape before they develop a black hem and deliquesce) with the stalk removed and filled with Brie or Camembert, coated in beaten egg, rolled in breadcrumbs and deep-fried.
Best of the Bunch Shaggy ink caps and other autumn toadstools ALTHOUGH toadstools/ mushrooms are not plants in the botanical sense, many of them are a natural and essential part of our gardens and, at this time of year, they become more obvious than at other times.