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Inn

(ĭn), river, c.320 mi (515 km) long, rising near the Lake of Sils, SE Switzerland. It flows NE through the Engadine valley, then through W Austria, past Innsbruck and Solbad Hall (the head of navigation), and into S central Germany. The Inn forms part of the German–Austrian border before entering the Danube River at Passau. There are more than 20 hydroelectric power plants on the river's swift-flowing stream.

inn,

in Great Britain, any hotel, public house, tavern, or coffeehouse where lodging is provided. In American usage, the inn is generally a small rural lodging house for transients. Among the earliest public houses were empty huts placed at caravan stops in the Middle East for the shelter of traders and travelers. To pilgrims, temples and religious houses gave rest and refreshment—a custom that still lingers in some Alpine hospices. The Romans maintained post stations on their great highways for the use of messengers of state and those especially privileged. For the accommodation of ordinary transients, stabularia were kept for man and beast. In the Middle Ages hospitality was observed as one of the Christian duties by the establishment of hospices in cities and by the entertainment of travelers at monasteries. Inns kept for profit appeared in Europe about the 15th cent. and gained a reputable standing in England, often being named for the powerful family on whose holdings they were established. They were usually built around a courtyard, approached by a wide, covered entry. In America, colonial inns similar to the English hostelries sprang up along the great turnpikes.

Bibliography

See W. C. Firebaugh, Inns of the Middle Ages (1924); H. A. Monckton, A History of the English Public House (1969).

Inn

A place which provides eating and drinking, but not lodging, for the public; a tavern.

inn

1. A place which provides eating and drinking, but no lodging, for the public; a tavern.
2. A hotel.
3. A student hostel or residence.
4. A hospice.

inn

1. a pub or small hotel providing food and accommodation
2. (formerly, in England) a college or hall of residence for students, esp of law, now only in the names of such institutions as the Inns of Court

Inn

a river in central Europe, rising in Switzerland in Graub?nden and flowing northeast through Austria and Bavaria to join the River Danube at Passau: forms part of the border between Austria and Germany. Length: 514 km (319 miles)

INN

(InterNet News) A complete Usenet system written by Rich Salz that includes an NNTP server and components for newsreading. INN is available from the Internet Systems Consortium (www.isc.org). See Usenet and ISC.
References in classic literature ?
We arrived at Lincoln's Inn Fields without any new adventures, except encountering an unlucky donkey in a costermonger's cart, who suggested painful associations to my aunt.
My father was always saying the inn would be ruined, for people would soon cease coming there to be tyrannized over and put down, and sent shivering to their beds; but I really believe his presence did us good.
The Temple, Chancery Lane, Serjeants' Inn, and Lincoln's Inn even unto the Fields are like tidal harbours at low water, where stranded proceedings, offices at anchor, idle clerks lounging on lop-sided stools that will not recover their perpendicular until the current of Term sets in, lie high and dry upon the ooze of the long vacation.
None thought of time or tide till the night was so far gone that Little John put by the thought of setting forth upon his journey again that night, and so bided at the Blue Boar Inn until the morrow.
Suppose the witnesses at the inn happen to know me?
I saw at once that the Donjon Inn was at least two centuries old --perhaps older.
There are no inns,' rejoined Mr Willet, with a strong emphasis on the plural number; 'but there's a Inn--one Inn--the Maypole Inn.
Don Quixote, observing the respectful bearing of the Alcaide of the fortress (for so innkeeper and inn seemed in his eyes), made answer, "Sir Castellan, for me anything will suffice, for
And, as though to add to the daily misery which this prosperous canal inflicted on the unfortunate inn-keeper, whose utter ruin it was fast accomplishing, it was situated between the Rhone from which it had its source and the post-road it had depleted, not a hundred steps from the inn, of which we have given a brief but faithful description.
The two young men galloped off in the direction mentioned and in ten minutes reached the inn.
There was not a room to be had at the inn, they were all occupied.
When I subsequently forced myself to consider it, the most distinct project I could frame for overcoming all difficulty was, to marry myself (the phrase is strictly descriptive of the Scotch ceremony) at the first inn we came to, over the Border; to hire a chaise, or take places in a public conveyance to Edinburgh, as a blind; to let Alicia and Mrs.