Innu


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Innu

1. a member of an Algonquian people living in Labrador and northern Quebec
2. the Algonquian language of this people
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
According to the archaeological record, the region was settled about 2,000 years ago by Montagnais Indians, who now call themselves Innu. In the spring, the Innu migrated to the shore from their winter camps deep in the interior mountains and forests.
Maggie Brown, who translated and taught him both Inuktitut and Innuaimun, the languages of the Inuit and Innu natives.
The Innu are not Innuit (the people that we used to call Eskimo); they are caribou hunting Indians that we used to call the Montagnais.
Survival released a report on the Innu last month, entitled Canada's Tibet -- the Killing of the Innu.
While some men in the community have found temporary employment in Voisey's Bay, only one Innu woman has landed a job.
Although perhaps not evident in this short excerpt, the collection's syntactical effects, combined with the use of Innu words and the layered lyric-I, create a palimpsestic poetics where ancient language and thought-patterns are made visible underneath modern thought and languages.
Allah Ditta son of Sher Muhammad Kharl alongwith his two female members of his family of Chah Innu village was on way to nearby village on an "applied for" bike and when he reached near Jhang Branch canal (Kaleke) three armed bandits intercepted him and snatched away gold ornaments, bike and Rs.
The environments profiled range from seacoast (the Maori of Ngai Tahu, the Irish of Antrim Glens) to snow (the Finns of Karelia, the Innu of Labrador) to swamp (the Botswana of Okavango, the Cajuns of Louisiana) to edge farming (the English of East Anglia's marshes, the Amish of Ohio's suburbs).
SKIN FOR SKIN: DEATH AND LIFE FOR INUIT AND INNU. By GERALD M.