inquisitor

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inquisitor

an official of the ecclesiastical court of the Inquisition
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in classic literature ?
Do you know that I am called Florian Barbedienne, actual lieutenant to monsieur the provost, and, moreover, commissioner, inquisitor, controller, and examiner, with equal power in provostship, bailiwick, preservation, and inferior court of judicature?--"
She meditated continually how the incubus could be shaken off her life--how she could be freed from this hateful bond to a being whom she at once despised as an imbecile, and dreaded as an inquisitor. For a long while she lived in the hope that my evident wretchedness would drive me to the commission of suicide; but suicide was not in my nature.
he does for a living?" pursued my inquisitor keenly.
Inquisitors don't come any grander than silver-maned Jeremy Paxman, scourge of political correctness.
Players must pick up the pieces of Cal's shattered past to complete his training and master the art of the iconic lightsaber - all while staying one step ahead of the Empire and its deadly Inquisitors.
For starters, Inquisitors of the none-more-grimdark Warhammer 40K universe aren't superheroes fighting hordes of enemies at a time, they're the scalpels of the Imperium, identifying corruption and surgically excising it - although Martyr's brilliantly atmospheric execution makes this an easy wrong to forgive.
Inquisitors under the (https://twitter.com/dragonage/status/509102792951083008) warrior class can use two-handed weapons and utilise particular skills for combat.
By the late sixteenth century, manual writers as well as the inquisitors came to see ritual as a means of gauging belief; a window into the soul, so to speak.
Ambiguous gender in early modern Spain and Portugal; inquisitors, doctors and the transgression of gender norms.
Sullivan, Karen, The Inner Lives of Medieval Inquisitors, Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 2011, cloth; pp.
Arguing that modern notions of witchcraft, both in the sense of evil deeds (maleficia) and pacts with the devil, were slow to develop, Decker emphasizes the Church's role in minimizing judicial abuses, restraining overzealous inquisitors, and preferring pastoral care in many cases over punishment.