insect physiology


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insect physiology

[′in‚sekt ‚fiz·ē′äl·ə·je]
(invertebrate zoology)
The study of the functional properties of insect tissues and organs.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (Icipe), the fly's larvae contain high protein and fat levels, 42 per cent and 29 per cent respectively and with the ease of growing and harvesting them, the fly is one of the world's most recommended sources of protein for animal feeds.Huijbers notes that growing the larvae does not need special breeding structures as she uses plastic trays, which retain warmth.
To address these challenges, the International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology and partners have developed and validated a fruit fly integrated pest management (IPM) package that has been tested in several locations in East and West Africa.
The project is the winner of the BioInnovate Africa programme funded by the Swedish Development Agency at a cost of Ksh 75 million and managed through the International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (Icipe).
In: Evans P (Ed.) Advances in Insect Physiology 29.
The International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology in Kenya was founded in 1970 and aims to improve the lives and health of people in tropical Africa by focusing on harmful and useful arthropods.We recently met with Dr.
The fellows are Alehegn Adane Kinde from the University of Gondar in Ethiopia, Arnold Mwanzu from the International Centre of Insect Physiology & Ecology in Kenya, Irina Livia Nitu from the National Library of Romania, Chantelle Richardson from the National Library of Jamaica, and Chandra Pratama Setiawan from Petra Christian University in Indonesia.
[PLA.sub.2]s are responsible for two separate actions in insect physiology. For one, [PLA.sub.2]s hydrolyze a fatty acid from the sn-2 position of dietary PLs.
He was member of the committee appointed by International Center of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), Nairobi, Kenya to review ICM programmes under PESTNET programme being carried out in Kenya, Tanzania, Rwanda and Zambia.
Sunday Ekesi, principal scientist at the International Center of Insect Physiology and Ecology in Nairobi, said Wednesday edible species of caterpillars, crickets, grasshoppers, stink bugs and even termites are highly nutritious and can be harvested, packaged and sold in markets.