Insect Repellents


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

Insect Repellents

 

(in Russian, antifidingi), chemical means of repelling insects from the plants on which they feed.

A comparatively small number of substances possessing these properties are known—for example, triphenyl tin oxide [(C6H5)3Sn]2O and triphenyl tin acetate (C6H5)3Sn(CH3COO). When plants are treated with even a small quantity of these substances, insects (such as the Colorado potato beetle and some types of the family Noctuidae) found on these plants are killed. This form of repellent has not received wide practical application at the present time.

References in periodicals archive ?
Most insect repellents designed for use on the skin must be registered by the U.S.
M2 PRESSWIRE-August 6, 2019-: Natural Insect Repellent Beat DEET Based Product in Black Flies Study at the University Of Georgia
The most common replacement for DEET is picaridin, which is found in many of the insect repellents intended for use on human skin.
"So when [patients] ask about the best insect repellent, for most situations I do recommend DEET or picaridin, at 10%-25% for DEET, or 7%-15% for picaridin," she said.
I suggest reviewing the July 2015 Consumer Reports article on repellents; picaridin is a likely safer alternative to DEET, with the highest efficacy of all those tested, at least in Sawyer Fisherman's Formula Picaridin Insect Repellent and Natrapel 8 Hour Insect Repellent.
Companies' voluntary placement of the new label graphic on insect repellent product labels will make it easier for consumers to choose a repellent.
Recently, Agricultural Research Service scientists in Beltsville, Maryland, showed that insect repellents also affect the mosquito's sense-of-taste (gustatory) receptors.
Christina Hantsch, MD, toxicologist at Loyola added that common insect repellent products contain up to 30% DEET for maximum protection, and products with DEET provide longer duration protection as the concentration of DEET increases.
Previously, when they took their young grandson on holiday, they had to use traditional chemical insect repellents such as deet-based products.
Their mothers, all living in the south east of England, were asked a series of questions, including whether they had been exposed to insect repellents and biocide chemicals such as pesticides or weedkillers.
The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Committee on Environmental Health updated their recommendations for use of DEET products on children in 2003, citing: "Insect repellents containing DEET with a concentration of 10% appear to be as safe as products with a concentration of 30% when used according to the directions on the product labels." The AAP recommends that repellents with DEET should not be used on infants less than two months old.
Oil of lemon eucalyptus, which is derived from eucalyptus leaves and is the only plant-based active ingredient for insect repellents approved by the CDC, is available in several different forms, including Repel Lemon Eucalyptus, OFF!