sting

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Related to Insect sting: bee sting, Spider bite

sting,

in zoology, organ found in bees, many wasps, some ants, and in scorpions and sting rays, used defensively as well as to kill or paralyze prey. In the bee and the wasp the venomvenom
or zootoxin,
any of a variety of poisonous substances produced by animals. In poisonous snakes, venom is secreted in two poison glands, one on each side of the upper jaw, and enters the fang by a duct.
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 is produced by glands associated with the ovipositor (egg-laying organ) of the female. As symptoms differ, it is assumed that the venom of each species of insect probably has slightly different chemical properties. The bee's "acid gland" produces histamine and proteinlike substances that are extremely dangerous to persons with specific allergies to them. Adrenaline injections may be lifesaving in such cases. In the honeybee the sting is a minute needle with tiny serrated edges, the teeth of which point backward. This makes it hard for the insect to pull the organ loose and often results in the fatal loss of the sting, the poison gland, and part of the intestine. Hornets, yellow jackets, and other wasps have sharp, smooth stings that can be used repeatedly. A few ants produce formic acid as a venom. The scorpion kills its prey with poison injected by a curved spine at the tip of its tail; the wound is painful to human adults and may be fatal to children. Strictly speaking, spiders bite rather than sting, since they inject their venom by means of fanglike cheliceras. Coelenterates, e.g., the hydra, jellyfish, and certain corals, are equipped with stinging capsules (nematocysts) consisting of a trigger mechanism that, when stimulated, raises the hydrostatic pressure of the cell so that hollow venom-bearing threads are ejected with enough force to pierce the prey. The larger coelenterates, e.g., the Portuguese man-of-war and Cyanea, are dangerous to man. The stingrays, or stingarees, have long whiplike tails bearing one to three sharply toothed, bony, poisonous stingers capable of inflicting painful wounds.

sting

1. a skin wound caused by the poison injected by certain insects or plants
2. pain caused by or as if by the sting of a plant or animal
3. a sharp pointed organ, such as the ovipositor of a wasp, by which poison can be injected into the prey
4. Slang a trap set up by the police to entice a person to commit a crime and thereby produce evidence

STING

A parallel dialect of Scheme intended to serve as a high-level operating system for symbolic programming languages. First-class threads and processors and customisable scheduling policies.

E-mail: <suresh@research.nj.dec.com>.

["A Customizable Substrate for Concurrent Languages", S. Jagannathan et al, ACM SIGPLAN Notices, 1992].
References in periodicals archive ?
The prevalence of insect sting allergy is estimated to be between 0.
Even if you've had mild allergic reactions to insect stings in the past, there is always the chance that future reactions can progress into more severe and possibly fatal anaphylactic reactions.
This condition commonly is triggered by insect stings (especially those of bees, hornets and wasps); foods (including milk, eggs, nuts, and shellfish); and widely used drugs (such as penicillin, seizure medicines, muscle relaxants, and even aspirin).
Seventy percent of those adults with an insect sting allergy surveyed (n=172) have experienced a severe allergic reaction while on vacation or taking a trip.
Sensitivity to insect stings frequently decreases over time or stops altogether, particularly among children.
They included a TV ad for the Crazy Frog ringtone, a Barclays Bank ad showing a man having an adverse reaction to an insect sting and an advert showing people spitting out Fanta.
Skipper David Beckham and his team will have their own special duvets, electric toothbrushes, insect sting treatment and 100 bottles of sunscreen, plus the top 50 DVDs, books and games.
Most people who are stung never have anything more than a local reaction - swelling, itching and irritation at the site of the sting," says Waterbury, CT, allergist Christopher Randolph, MD, a member of AANMA's Anaphylaxis Community Expert (ACE) program and co-author of the Joint Task Force on Insect Sting Guidelines.
The coroner recorded a verdict of death by natural causes-coronary and respiratory failure resulting from an insect sting.
Gretna winger Ryan Baldacchino has been given the all-clear after being rushed home to hospital with an insect sting in the eye while at the club's training camp on the Continent.
If the swelling is related to his/her time in the garden it could be an insect sting or perhaps an `allergic' reaction to a plant.
AROUND one in 100 people will have a potentially fatal reaction to an insect sting, but actual deaths are extremely rare.