dietary fiber

(redirected from Insoluble fibre)
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dietary fiber

[¦dī·ə‚ter·ē ′fī·bər]
(food engineering)
The plant-cell-wall polysaccharides and lignin in a food or food ingredient that are not broken down by the digestive enzymes of animals and humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
Insoluble fibre helps to improve laxation and prevent constipation, mainly by increasing fetal bulk and reducing bowel transit time [16].
Insoluble fibre helps prevent constipation and soluble fibre may help to reduce the amount of cholesterol in the blood.
Dr Sarah Jarvis says: "Both the soluble fibres found in fruits and oats and the insoluble fibre found in bran and cereals can help to reduce the risk of developing heart disease.
Fruit and vegetables contain both soluble and insoluble fibre - but much of it is in the skin so, whenever possible, don't peel them.
leeks and their elongated stalks provide soluble and insoluble fibre.
There are 61 calories in 100g of fresh leeks and their elongated stalks provide soluble and insoluble fibre.
Insoluble fibre helps prevent constipation, and soluble fibre may help to reduce the amount of cholesterol in the blood.
The older leaves contain more of the insoluble fibre that causes gas.
Soluble fibre steadies the rate of nutrient absorption in the body and assists in the removal of cholesterol from the body, while insoluble fibre increases the rate at which waste products are removed from the system through the intestine.
Oats are a good source of insoluble fibre, may help reduce cholesterol, and release energy slowly, making you feel fuller for longer.
Put simply, insoluble fibre is the part of plant food that is not digested by you.
A IT is possible you are not eating enough insoluble fibre that is needed to help a sluggish bowel.