insomniac

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insomniac

[in′säm·nē‚ak]
(medicine)
A person who is susceptible to insomnia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since its inception, Insomniacs Digital Agency has been a prevalent name in digital marketing.
Summary: Washington DC [USA], October 28 (ANI): If your parents or grandparents are insomniac then you may ask them to drink montmorency tart cherry juice, as according to a recent study it may help to extend their sleep time by 84 minutes.
Subgroup analysis showed that persistent insomniacs had a higher 3 year cumulative incidence rate of stroke than those with insomnia in remission.
For instance, many good sleepers find reading in bed triggers sleep because they associate it with relaxation, whereas insomniacs use books to divert them from the frustration of being awake.
INVESTIGATION: Presenter Sian Williams NEEDING HELP: The insomniacs
Also prescribed frequently to insomniac patients at ACIM--as it has been by healers around the world for nearly 2,000 years--is the herb valerian.
The Insomniacs (Altcinema): Kami Chrisholm's latest lesbian-themed short offers a quirky, after-hours vision of a butch, who is up late, catching classic films, studying herself in the mirror and, naturally, craving waffles.
"This is the first study to evaluate sleep and bladder diaries of insomniacs, people with overactive bladders, and controls," said Dr.
Insomniacs lack the ability to fall asleep and sleep well (though Shaw and his colleagues think such people may be protected from the full negative effects of sleeplessness).
Instead of treating insomniacs with pills, CBT counsels small changes in behavior that will lead to more soporific outcomes, changes that are sometimes grouped under the rubrics "sleep hygiene" and "sleep restriction." For instance, use blackout drapes, CBT advises.
The Insomniacs have been nominated for a Blues Music Award by The Blues Foundation for its 2007 debut album, "Left Coast Blues."
"Adult insomniacs have quite often been poor sleepers as children, and people who are insomniacs are likely to develop depression and use health services more for a variety of reasons.