integral photography

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integral photography

[‚int·i·grəl fə′täg·rə·fē]
(optics)
A type of three-dimensional photography in which the photographic medium is placed at the focal plane of a microlens array, and the developed image is viewed through the same lens array, allowing the object to be reconstructed in full parallax.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Three-dimensional (3D) imaging and visualization techniques based on integral imaging have been paid increasing attention as various industries require 3D techniques in recent years.
The 3D images used in this paper were obtained by the independent authors either from a plenoptic camera (Figures 6 and 8) or by means of the computer simulation of the integral imaging (Figures 1 and 10).
Other than traditional stereoscope system, autostereoscopic systems like integral imaging and holography are seemed to overcome the VAC problem [22].
Integral imaging (II) is considered as one of the attractive three-dimensional (3D) technologies since it can provide both horizontal and vertical parallaxes and quasi-continuous viewing angles [1-4].
had proposed performance-enhanced image encryption schemes based on depth-conversion integral imaging and chaotic maps [11].
Proposals for papers are invited on topics including holographic interferometry, phase microscopy, novel holographic processes, 3D displays, integral imaging, computer generated holograms, compressive holography, holography with incoherent sources, and full-field tomography, as well as special techniques for optical trapping, cellular microscopy, aberration compensation, and super-resolution.
The other projection method is integral imaging, which uses a two-dimensional array of many small lenses or holes to create 3-D effects.
The 3D LCD TVs utilize an integral imaging system and a perpendicular lenticular sheet to display smooth, natural images, and Toshiba's image processing technology to create nine parallax images from the original content and create to 3D images.
Toshiba tackled these challenges by creating an integral imaging system that reproduces light beams similar to those produced by a real object--not its visual representation.