Intel 4004


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Intel 4004

(processor)
The world's first microprocessor, released in 1971. The 4004 contained 2300 transistors (compared with 5.5 million in the 1996 Pentium Pro) and was intended for use in a calculator. It processed data in 4 bits, but its instructions were 8 bits long. Program and Data memory were separate, it had 1 kilobyte of data memory and a 12-bit PC for 4K of program memory (in the form of a 4 level stack, used for CALL and RET instructions). There were also sixteen 4-bit (or eight 8-bit) general purpose registers. The 4004 had 46 instructions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Until now, developments in the chip industry were driven by a prophecy made by Intel's co-founder Gordon Moore that has led us from the Intel 4004 (with around 2,300 transistors embedded) to the Intel Skylake, with approximately 1.
For example, compared to the Intel 4004, today's second-generation Intel(r) Core(tm) processors are more than 350,000 times the performance and each transistor uses about 5,000 times less energy.
Two months after SABR was founded, one of the signal events in the history of computing occurred, the introduction of the Intel 4004.
It was the ready availability of new low-cost electronic components--the first Intel 4004 microprocessor and a small integrated circuit pressure transducer, that made the commercial development possible (5).
The 1971 Intel 4004 chip had 2,250 transistors; the present-day Pentium 4 holds 42 million.
In November, 1971, Intel, a small start-up company, announced the first microprocessor--the Intel 4004.
The outcome was the chip that was later put on the market as the Intel 4004.
The Intel Xeon E5 processors made their way onto the TOP500 list in the year of the 40th anniversary of availability of the world's first microprocessor (the Intel 4004 processor) and on the 10th anniversary of the launch of the Intel Xeon brand.
Three decades later, the Intel Pentium 4 HT processor sported 125 million transistors - more than 50,000 times more than the Intel 4004.
For example, compared to the Intel 4004, today's second-generation Intel[R] Core[TM] processors are more than 350,000 times the performance and each transistor uses about 5,000 times less energy.
Second-Generation Intel[R] Core[TM] i7 Processor Family 'Goes Extreme' on the Eve of the 40(th) Anniversary of the Intel 4004 CPU
Stanley Mazor is one of the inventors of the first microprocessor, the Intel 4004.