Intel 4004


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Intel 4004

(processor)
The world's first microprocessor, released in 1971. The 4004 contained 2300 transistors (compared with 5.5 million in the 1996 Pentium Pro) and was intended for use in a calculator. It processed data in 4 bits, but its instructions were 8 bits long. Program and Data memory were separate, it had 1 kilobyte of data memory and a 12-bit PC for 4K of program memory (in the form of a 4 level stack, used for CALL and RET instructions). There were also sixteen 4-bit (or eight 8-bit) general purpose registers. The 4004 had 46 instructions.
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Intel's first ever processor, the Intel 4004 was a 4-bit CPU on a single chip.
For example, compared to the Intel 4004, today's second-generation Intel(r) Core(tm) processors are more than 350,000 times the performance and each transistor uses about 5,000 times less energy.
Two months after SABR was founded, one of the signal events in the history of computing occurred, the introduction of the Intel 4004. The 4004 was the first single-chip CPU available as a commercial product.
Timeline of Events YEAR SABR & Baseball Events IT Events 1971 SABR Founded IBM 370 Intel 4004 8-inch floppy 1974 BRA (Palmer/Cramer) Altair MITS PC 1976 Wiley BRJ article Microsoft founded Ethernet deployed at Xerox PARC 1977 First Baseball Abstract 1978 Intel 8086 introduced 1979 Runs Created created by Bill James Dr.
It was the ready availability of new low-cost electronic components--the first Intel 4004 microprocessor and a small integrated circuit pressure transducer, that made the commercial development possible (5).
The 1971 Intel 4004 chip had 2,250 transistors; the present-day Pentium 4 holds 42 million.
In November, 1971, Intel, a small start-up company, announced the first microprocessor--the Intel 4004. It used solid state integrated circuit technology that the firm had been using to make memory "chips" to develop the logic circuitry of a computer's central processing unit.
The outcome was the chip that was later put on the market as the Intel 4004. Steady progress continued, and led to further developments: In April 1972 came the Intel 8008 which comprised 3,300 transistors, and then in April 1974 came the 8080 which had 4,500 transistors.
Until now, developments in the chip industry were driven by a prophecy made by Intel's co-founder Gordon Moore that has led us from the Intel 4004 (with around 2,300 transistors embedded) to the Intel Skylake, with approximately 1.75 billion transistors embedded on it.
The Intel 4004, Intel's first microprocessor, featured 2,250 transistors back in 1971.