developmental disability

(redirected from Intellectual disabilities)
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developmental disability

[də¦vel·əp‚ment·əl ‚dis·ə‚bil·əd·ē]
(medicine)
A substantial handicap or impairment originating before the age of 18 that may be expected to continue indefinitely.
References in periodicals archive ?
Special Olympics Project UNIFY aims to build closer ties between students with and without intellectual disabilities through structured sports and socialization activities.
While I did not think that everyone would be quite as dedicated to individuals with intellectual disabilities as I am, I did think that they would generally respect those with disabilities and try to serve this population to the best of their ability.
Increased protection of women and men with psychosocial and intellectual disabilities, enhanced provision with remedies against ill-treatment, and their participation supported in all matters related to torture prevention in health care facilities;
Parents and siblings of those with intellectual disabilities have come to understand and appreciate the dignity and worth of every person.
5 million people with intellectual disabilities in the UK and a significant number are under 18," said Professor Jeremy Hall, from Cardiff University's MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics & Genomics.
This powerful video conveys hope that people's attitudes about disability will change when athletes with Intellectual Disabilities are seen competing at such a high profile sporting event.
Namibia will be represented by Elvira Goagoses-an athelete with intellectual disability and Josephine Amutenya--a partner without intellectual disabilities.
findings of previous studies revealed that perceptions of people with intellectual disabilities varied from one ethnic group to another with European Americans having the most favorable attitudes, African Americans in the middle and Latino and/or Asian Americans having the least favorable attitudes (Saeteremoe, Scattone, & Kim, 2001; Shokoohi-Yekta & Retish, 1991; Whaley, 1997).
Special Olympics' goal for Healthy Communities is to achieve improved health outcomes for people with intellectual disabilities with the ultimate goal of ensuring that all are receiving health services and are able to reach their full potential.
The goal of Resolution 2 is to create awareness within the nursing and student nursing community to join together in a common voice to clearly state to the American Psychiatric Association, publishers of the DSM-IV that language concerning individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) MUST BE UPDATED.
Unfortunately, a lot of kids with intellectual disabilities are given up for adoption when they're born because it's a lot for their family," she said.