intercession

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intercession

1. the act of interceding or offering petitionary prayer to God on behalf of others
2. such petitionary prayer
3. Roman history the interposing of a veto by a tribune or other magistrate
References in periodicals archive ?
She especially emphasizes how the actions of intercessory prayer and reconciliation are perfectly related to the theme of mission for the sake of the world.
As I read the stories of rejection, anxiety, and fear, I sensed a plea for understanding, empathy, and intercessory prayer.
Like his society, Augustine had varying views of whether one's fate could be affected after death, by God through fiery purgation or through the intercessory prayers and actions of those left behind.
It comprised readings from the Bible, intercessory prayers and hymns in Oriya, the main language of Orissa.
The bishops said that clergy may celebrate a eucharist and intercessory prayers with a same-sex couple, but not pronounce a nuptial blessing.
I have been praying Jabez' prayer for my church as well, and exciting things are happening--slowly but surely--and I believe this is in part to my Jabez prayer as well as intercessory prayers.
Joseph, said, "I am confident that those who came to seek the intercessory prayers and blessing of Saint Padre Pio discovered that they, too, have in him a companion for their suffering.
Her] intercessory prayers keep me whole and complete, and I sing her praises daily.
In exchange for financial support, the laity could expect a variety of rewards: intercessory prayers, companionship in time of crisis, a home for widows, and the prestige of association with a holy enterprise.
This has practical and methodological consequences, for example, there are no explanations offered in IP studies for the choices of outcome measures, types of intercessors, wording of intercessory prayers, choices of patient conditions studied, etc.
21) The unsettling reality of poverty's extent (especially in Africa) should lead to intense supplicatory and intercessory prayers to God.
Western medieval missals separate the Preface from the Canon and develop the latter with intercessory prayers, with the effect of defining the sacrifice not from Christ's death sacramentally present but from the Church's and priest's offering of Christ's Body and Blood to the Father.