intercostal nerve

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intercostal nerve

[¦in·tər¦käst·əl ¦nerv]
(neuroscience)
Any of the branches of the thoracic nerves in the intercostal spaces.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, it was not possible to identify the origin of the innervation of the upper fascicle, which if it was by neighborhood, it could be given by a muscular branch from the intercostal nerves. Functionally, the dorsoepicondylar medial muscle could act as a weak adductor of the arm given its insertion points and the direction of its muscular fibers.
Neurogenic tumors located in the posterior mediastinum are paravertebral masses that often originate from the thoracic nerve roots, sympathetic truncus, or intercostal nerves. In a study conducted by Teixira et al., neurogenic tumors were reported to account for 23.6% of all mediastinal tumors.
The breast is innervated by multiple nerve branches, including the lateral and anterior cutaneous branches of the second to sixth thoracic intercostal nerves (TICNs) and several branches of the supraclavicular nerves (Figure 5) [17, 18].
The reflex arc of the hiccup has 3 components: the afferent limb composed of phrenic, vagus, and sympathetic nerves; a central processor in the midbrain; and the efferent limb composed of the phrenic nerve supplying the diaphragm and intercostal nerves supplying the intercostal muscle fibers [3].
Its normal innervation is the intercostal nerves ranging from T1 to T4 or T5.
The disadvantages of peripheral nerve block includes high concentrations of plasma level of drug due to high blood feeding around intercostal nerves, patients discomfort and prolonged neuralgia.
The 2 major donor nerves were spinal accessory (41%) and intercostal nerves (ICN) (26%).
Redefining the course of the intercostal nerves: a new understanding of the innervation of the anterior abdominal wall.
We also recommend using blunt dissecting technique on the lateral side of the pocket to avoid the damage of the intercostal nerves. [sup][12] The more you dissect the lateral side of the pocket, the more likely you will damage the intercostal nerves.
Flank bulge has never been reported following PCNL; however, flank bulge is a known potential complication of flank incisions for various retroperitoneal surgical procedures and has been reported in the urological,[sup.12] vascular[sup.13] and neurosurgical literature.[sup.14,15] Flank bulge due to laxity of the anterolateral abdominal musculature may be caused by damage to intercostal nerves.[sup.14] In a cadaveric and electrophysiological study, Fahim and colleagues showed that the most significant intercostal nerve contributions to the anterolateral wall came from the T11 and T12 nerves.[sup.14] They concluded that postoperative flank bulge was likely due to denervation of the abdominal musculature from injury to the T11 and T12 intercostal nerves.
Nerves that respond well to freezing include the ilioinguinal nerves, intercostal nerves and superficial femoral nerves.